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A.B. Simpson

  • auc
  • Person
  • 1843-1919

Albert Benjamin Simpson was born to James and Jane Simpson in Bayview, Prince Edward Island on December 15, 1843. As a young child, his family relocated to a homestead outside of Chatham, Ontario. A. B. Simpson entered Knox College, Toronto in the fall of 1861 in order to prepare for the ministry. In the summer of 1865, fresh out of seminary, the twenty-one year old Simpson accepted the call to the pulpit of Knox Church in Hamilton, Ontario. He was officially ordained by the Hamilton Presbytery on September 12, 1865. The next day, he was married to Margaret Henry of Toronto. In October of 1873, he was invited to the pastorate of Chestnut Street Presbyterian Church in Louisville, Kentucky, which he accepted in December of that year. In September of 1879, he relocated to New York City to become the pastor of Thirteenth Street Presbyterian. Burdened by a heart for the lost and forgotten peoples in far away lands, in early 1880 Simpson began editing and producing an illustrated missionary periodical which he entitled, The Gospel in All Lands. In the summer of 1881, his health in shambles underneath a tremendous workload, Simpson's body was miraculously healed, an experience which not only prolonged his life, but would prove formative for the following decades of his ministry. In October of the same year, finding himself in disagreement with the Presbyterian position on infant baptism, and troubled by the reticence of the congregation to reach out to the lost of the city, Simpson tendered his resignation from both the church and presbytery. Within two weeks, he began conducting public meetings in rented halls. By 1883, the new church which Simpson led had grown to 217 members, and his Sunday night outreach services were regularly attracting crowds of 700 people. Halfway through the year his congregation incorporated legally under the name Gospel Tabernacle. In 1882, Simpson launched another missionary periodical named The Word, the Work and the World. In March of 1883, his congregation formed its own missionary society, "The Missionary Union for the Evangelization of the World". In October of the same year, the Gospel Tabernacle launched the Missionary Training College. In October of 1885, Simpson held a convention which brought together a number of ministers from across denominational lines. Following the convention, Simpson, along with several of the key speakers from the convention, undertook a multi-city tour. In 1886, Simpson was invited to bring a similar convention to Old Orchard camp in Main. It was out of this convention that a movement was sparked which would consolidate in the form of two complementary alliances, the "Christian Alliance" and the "Evangelical Missionary Alliance". The following summer at the second gathering at Old Orchard in August of 1887, the constitutions to both alliances were finalized and adopted. The two alliances were not formed with an eye towards constructing a fresh denomination. Rather, the alliances were to function as "spiritual catalysts among existing denominations for holy living and world missions."1 By 1893, the Alliance had fielded 180 missionaries throughout the world. By 1895, that number had grown to almost 300. In 1897, the Missionary Training College was moved to Nyack, NY, and assumed the name of "Missionary Training Institute". A. B Simpson continued tirelessly in his full schedule of preaching to congregations, speaking at conventions, teaching at Nyack, writing books and magazine articles, and leading and administrating a growing international movement. On October 29, 1919, A. B. Simpson went to be with the Lord. Paul Rader, pastor of Moody Church in Chicago, succeeded Simpson as president of the Christian and Missionary Alliance. More biographical information on Simpson as well as information concerning the early history of the Christian and Missionary Alliance can be found in the book by R. Nicklaus, J. Sawin and S. Stoesz entitled, All for Jesus: God at Work in the Christian and Missionary Alliance over One Hundred Years. (Camp Hill, Penn.: Christian Publications Inc., 1986).

Aaker, Henry

  • MED
  • Person
  • 1930-

Henry Aaker's parents originally lived in the Drumheller area with his mother's family. His father was Swedish and his mother, Valena Hood, a Metis.. His mother was a deaf mute who had gone to school in Winnipeg and later worked in a café. Henry's parents moved to Conrad, Montana and Henry was born there on May 5, 1930, however, his mother left his father and a daughter, when Henry was just six weeks old. Valena returned to Saratoga Park in Medicine Hat, where her mother, Louisa Cayenne, now lived. Louisa had five daughters and six sons, whom she raised single-handed. Some of Louisa's children were: Joseph, Napoleon (Nap), John, Jasper, Jimmy, Virginia (Pinney), Emily (Swain), Flora (Alldorf) and Valena (Aaker). Henry's mother died young, and he and his future wife, Phyllis, were raised by his grandmother, Louisa. Henry was nicknamed "Yank" as he had been born in the States. Mrs. Louisa Cayenne appears to have been someone of importance in the "village" of Saratoga Park, where most families were related. Apparently, Louisa had been given her land by Mr. Mitchell and was considered a "squatter", along with most of the other residents who lived there. Saratoga Park was located in the Flats area, bounded by Bridge Street, Allowance Avenue and Seven Persons Creek. Henry and Phyllis were married March 17 1951 at St. Barnabas Church in the midst of a blizzard. As a Metis, it was often difficult to obtain work but Henry secured a position and worked at the local Iron Works for 28 years. Henry and Phyllis raised two children, a son, Henry Jr., and a daughter, Joanne. Phyllis died on October 19, 2001.

Aberhart, William

  • paa
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William ("Bible Bill") Aberhart was born December 30, 1878 near Seaforth, Ontario; he was the son of William and Louisa (Pepper) Aberhart. He studied at Mitchell Model School, Chatham Business College, Seaforth Collegiate Institute and the Ontario Normal School in Hamilton, Ontario. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Queen's University in 1911; he accomplished this by correspondence beginning in 1907. In 1899, he taught at Morris School, near Wingham, Ontario. In 1901, he moved to Brantford, Ontario and taught at Central Public School; he was appointed principal of Central Public School in 1905. He was active in Brantford's Zion Presbyterian Church and for a time planned on entering the Presbyterian ministry. He married Jessie Flatt on July 29, 1902; they had two daughters, Khona Louise (Cooper), born November 1, 1903, and Ola Janette (MacNutt), born August 31, 1905. The Aberhart family moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1910, as Aberhart had accepted an offer from the Calgary School Board to become principal of Mount Royal College beginning in the spring of 1910. However, the school was not ready when he arrived so he became principal of Alexandra Public School. In the fall of 1910, with Mount Royal still not ready, he became principal of Victoria School. When ready, he did become principal of Mount Royal School and then in 1913 became the principal of King Edward School. From 1915 to 1935, Aberhart was principal of Crescent Heights High School. He taught bible classes at Trinity Methodist Church until 1916 and attended and taught classes at Grace Presbyterian Church until 1912. The Aberhart family then attended Wesley Methodist Church and Westbourne Baptist Church where Aberhart was eventually recognized as a lay minister and baptized on May 2, 1920. By 1918, Aberhart's bible classes we so popular and well attended, the classes were renamed the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference. In 1925, he was appointed Dean of the newly established Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute. Also beginning in 1925, Aberhart's Sunday afternoon bible lectures for the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference were broadcast over the radio; these became known as "Back-to-the-Bible Hour." In 1929, Aberhart established the Bible Institute Baptist Church. Beginning in 1932, influenced by personal experiences brought on by the Depression, Aberhart began to give serious thought and study to the social credit theories espoused by Major C.H. Douglas. In 1933, Aberhart began giving lectures on these theories, soon forming a Social Credit Study Group; other study groups formed across Calgary and the province. Aberhart organized the Douglas Social Credit League in 1933 (later the Alberta Social Credit League). Initially trying to work with United Farmers of Alberta to implement social credit theories, when this failed, Aberhart organized the social credit movement into a political party, and this Alberta Social Credit Party won the majority of seat in the 1935 provincial election. As leader of the Social Credit Party, even though he did not run, Aberhart was sworn in as Premier and Minister of Education on September 3; on November 3, 1935, a by-election was held in the electoral district of Okotoks-High River which Aberhart won by acclamation. On September 5, 1937, he was appointed Attorney General. He was reelected in 1940 for electoral district of Calgary. Suffering form illness, Aberhart and his wife traveled to Vancouver, British Columbia in April of 1943 to visit their daughters. William Aberhart died May 23, 1943 and was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Aberhart, William

  • UOFC
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William Aberhart was born on a farm near Kippen, Ontario on December 30, 1878 to William Aberhart Senior and Louisa Pepper. He attended Chatham Business College and received teacher training at the Mitchell Model School and the Ontario Normal School in Hamilton, Ontario. He also obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 1911. He taught in several schools in southern Ontario, becoming principal of the Central Public School in Brantford Ontario, before moving to Calgary in 1910. During his time in Brantford, Aberhart also preached in local churches and conducted Bible study classes. Although he grew up in a nominally Presbyterian household, Aberhart and his wife entered the Baptist faith when residing in Calgary. Between 1910 and 1915, Aberhart was principal of three public schools in Calgary: Alexandra, Mount Royal and King Edward. In 1915, he was appointed principal of Crescent Heights High School, a position that he held for twenty years. While in Calgary, he continued to preach in a number of churches and also held Bible study classes. In 1918 he founded the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference to promote Bible study in Calgary. His sermons and teachings were so popular that the Palace Theatre had to be rented to accommodate all who wished to participate. In 1925, he started broadcasting Sunday afternoon lectures on the radio called the "Back to the Bible Hour". These biblical lectures drew listeners from across the Canadian prairies and the adjacent U.S. states. In 1927 he was appointed Dean of the newly organized Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute. This institute served as a centre of worship and biblical studies, and also produced Aberhart's radio broadcasts. During this time, he was often known as "Bible Bill," in reference to his religious preaching. Aberhart became interested in politics in the 1930s as a result of the Great Depression. He particularly was interested in the 'social credit' theories of Scottish engineer Major C.H. Douglas which addressed the "discrepancy between the costs of production and the purchasing power of individuals." He founded the Social Credit League and began lobbying the Alberta government, held by the United Farmers of Alberta, to adopt some of the social credit policies. When this attempt failed, Aberhart organized Alberta's Social Credit League and the party won the 1935 Alberta provincial election by a landslide. Aberhart himself had not been a candidate in the election, but because he was the leader of the Social Credit League, he was proclaimed Premier of Alberta. He won a by-election in the electoral district of Okotoks-High River two months after being proclaimed Premier. From 1935-1943, Aberhart held the portfolios of Minister of Education and Attorney General. After the general election of 1940, Aberhart represented the multi-member electoral district of Calgary. During his tenure as Premier, Aberhart and the Social Credit government were successful in legislating its "prosperity certificate" program and also in making changes to Alberta's educational system and labour laws. They also established oil and gas conservation practices and provincial marketing boards. However, the Social Credit policies were not fully realized - attempts to change legislation pertaining to the administration of banks or operation of the newspapers in the province were unsuccessful. Although three bills were passed to amend legislation, the Supreme Court of Canada and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council ruled these bills unconstitutional. William Aberhart married Jessie Flatt of Galt, Ontario in 1902 and had two daughters, Ola Janet and Khona Louise. He died suddenly on May 23, 1943 while in Vancouver, British Columbia. A high school in Calgary and a long-term care facility in Edmonton are named in his honour.

Aberhart, William

  • glen-1
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William "Bible Bill" Aberhart, 1878-1943, was born in Ontario. He studied at the Hamilton Normal School and was granted his BA from Queen's University in 1911. In 1902 he married Janet Jessie Flatt, 1878-1966, and they had two children, Ola (MacNutt), 1905-2000, and Khona (Cooper), 1903-2000. In 1910 they moved to Calgary, Alberta and Aberhart became a high school principal. He was principal of Crescent Heights High School, 1915-1935. He ran popular bible classes, and in 1925 began his Sunday afternoon radio broadcasts, called the "Back to the Bible Hour". In 1927 he opened the Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute, and two years later founded the Bible Institute Baptist Church. In 1932 he became interested in the monetary ideas of Major C.H. Douglas, who espoused state supervision of credit and dividend payments to citizens. He founded the Social Credit League, and in 1935 became the premier of Alberta when Social Credit swept the United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) government from power. The government was unable to implement Aberhart's proposed reforms because the legislation was disallowed by the federal government. Aberhart died in office. In 1974 the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated Aberhart as a National Historic Person. For further information see Bible Bill / David R. Elliott and Iris Miller. - Edmonton : Reidmore Books, 1987.

Adams, Annie

  • glen
  • Person

The Adams family came to Alberta ca. 1903 and farmed in the Swalwell and Cochrane districts. Annie Adams and her husband had at least four children, Annie, Nancy, Etta and Ida. Nancy, 1884-1971, married Walter David Patterson. Etta married William L. Lockhart. Ida married Roy Bishop. William's sister, Ardella May Lockhart, married George Rutter Austin. They had at least one child, Ronald George Austin, 1941- . R.G. Austin later changed his name to Keath Austen.

Adams, Bob

  • ppcli
  • Person

No biographical information available.

Adams, Samuel H.

  • glen-11
  • Person
  • 1878-1975

Samuel H. Adams, 1878-1975, was born near Dundas, Ontario and raised at Crooks' Hollow. He moved to Manitoba in 1897 and taught school until entering Manitoba College in 1902. He graduated in 1906 and moved to Calgary, Alberta the same year. He worked briefly for Bernard and Bernard law firm before joining Jones, Nicholas and Pescod. He was called to the Bar in 1909. In 1910 he married Margaret Ross, who was originally from Manitoba, and they had four daughters, Jesse, Muriel (Graham), Fanny L., and Ruth. He was an alderman, 1916-1921, and Calgary's mayor, 1921-1922. He then returned to his law practice until retiring to Salt Spring Island, British Columbia in 1955.

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