Showing 215 results

Authority record
University of Calgary Archives

University of Alberta. Students' Union

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

The Evergreen and Gold is the official yearbook of the University of Alberta. It chronicles student life at the University of Alberta in Edmonton and is published annually by the Students' Union.

University of Alberta, Calgary

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

Except for Mount Royal College (MRC), there were no other facilities of higher education in Calgary in the 1930s and 1940s. Although MRC had been granted permission to offer first year university courses in affiliation with the University of Alberta (U of A), the pressure of returning soldiers seeking an education and a forseeable baby boom made a new facility a necessity. When the government closed the Normal Schools and placed Teacher training under the guidance of the U of A's Faculty of Education, it was seen as a foot in the door by the Calgary University Committee who advocated a full University in Calgary. In 1946 this educational facility became known as the Calgary Branch of the University of Alberta. More courses were gradually added: Arts & Sciences (1951); Commerce (1953); Physical Education (1956); Engineering (1957). In 1957 the campus became known as the University of Alberta in Calgary and became a full-fledged extension of the U of A; in 1961 it was known as the University of Alberta, Calgary; during 1965-1966 it was known as University of Alberta at Calgary. The push for automony in 1964 eventually saw the establishment of separate Faculty councils for Edmonton and Calgary and in May, 1965, the government conceded autonomy in most academic and financial affairs for Calgary. From 1964 to 1966, each campus had its own president and its own General Faculty Council (GFC). Full autonomy was accorded under the new Universities Act in April, 1966. The Library Building Committee at the University of Alberta, Calgary was established by M.G. Taylor, Principal. It became a subcommittee of the University of Alberta (Edmonton) Buildings and Grounds Committee. The Coordinating Council was apparently set up in response to the growing autonomy of the Calgary campus. A new coordinating body was established in 1966 under the Universities Act.

University of Alberta, Calgary Associates

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

The University of Alberta, Calgary Associates was incorporated as a society in 1963 following an initiative by Dr. Malcolm G. Taylor, Principal of UAC. Dr. Taylor approached several law firms, petroleum companies and other Calgary businesses to solicit response to setting up the Associates. The objectives of the society were to promote public interest in the University of Alberta, Calgary, to assist in the university's long-range development plans, and to obtain financial assistance to further the objectives of the university and its library. The society was open to all person's, corporations or organizations who had an interest in promoting the objectives of the Associates, regardless of whether they were alumni of the University. J. Ross Henderson was the first Chairman. The society appears to have been active until 1966.

University of Calgary. Gastrointestinal Research Group

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

The Gastrointestinal Research Group in the Faculty of Medicine is a group of basic and clinical investigators who study the gastrointestinal tract and liver in health and in a variety of important human diseases. Members of the research group study the normal functions of the gut and liver and aspects of diseases such as ulcers, colon cancer, and hepatitis. There are opportunities for trainees of all levels in the group and expressions of interest are welcome.

University of Calgary. Information Resources

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

Information Resources Group came into existence in 1998 as a result of the reorganisation of the Division of Information Services into Information Resources Group, Information Technologies Group and the Learning Commons. Headed by a Director who reports directly to the Vice-President (Academic), the Information Resources Group initially consisted of the University Libraries, University Archives, the Image Centre and the University Press. In 2000 the Nickle Arts Museum was added to the Group. Each of the constituent units within IR have fonds level descriptions. The records that exist for this fonds are those created by the administration office which consists of the Director and his support staff who are responsible for the administration of the overall Group.

University of Calgary. Office of Community Relations

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

Until 1980, the Office of Community Relations was known as University Resources. The Office of Community Relations is composed of Advancement Services, Alumni Affairs/Alumni Association, the Development Office (fund raising), and University Marketing and Communications.

University of Calgary. University Audit Services

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

The Internal Audit Department was formed in 1981. The name changed in 1987 to the Internal Audit Office and then again in 1996 to University Audit Services. University Audit Services is a team of chartered accountants with experience in public practice, industry, and the university environment. Audit projects are selected by the annual work plan (based on institutional risk assessment), invitation, and request. Audit Services aims to effectively discharge responsibilities through independent and objective analysis, appraisals, and recommendations. Consistent with the approved mandate, the focus of University Audit Services includes the following activities: assess and recommend improvements in university internal controls that assist the university in achieving its mission; assist university administrators in the assessment and development of new business processes and information systems; work with university faculty and staff in enhancing knowledge and skills around administrative practices; conduct reviews of operations in the areas of institutional priority; conduct reviews at the request of the senior administration; inform senior administrators of emerging issues and possible impacts on university operations and business risks; provide value added consulting services to the university community.

University of Calgary. University General Counsel

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

The University General Counsel advises on the legal issues at the University of Calgary. This includes such things as procedures governing student discipline, recommendations that are not consistent with the provisions of the Universities Act, appropriate wording for policies and procedures, and statements in publications that are contrary to Human Rights. Also known as Legal Counsel.

University of Calgary (1912-1915)

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

In 1910, a number of Calgary business owners and the municipal government began a movement to establish a private university in Calgary. By October 1912, classes had begun in what was optimistically called the University of Calgary. Classes were held in the Public Library under the Faculties of Arts and Law with a staff of four professors, 24 regular students and 101 part-time students (those taking one class or more). The members of the Board of Governors were: Thomas Henry Blow (Chair), W.J. Tregillus (Secretary), J.S. Dennis, James Short, William Georgeson, H.W. Riley and R.B. Bennett. The first faculty members were Dean Edward E. Braithwaite, Professor F.H. MacDougall (Chemistry and Mathematics), Professor Mack Eastman (History and Politics) and Professor F.C. Ward. Funding for the University came from private donations and donations of land and money from members of the Board: W.J. Tregillis donated 160 acres in the Rosscarrock Subdivision on the Old Banff Coach Road; T.H. Blow donated $40,000 and the City set aside $150,000. An architectural plan for the proposed site was drawn up by Mr. Dunnington-Grubbs, one of Canada's foremost landscape architects. The University applied three times (1911, 1913 and 1915) for the right to be given degree-granting powers but was turned down all three times. Reasons cited were the financial burden for the province to sustain two Universities and a fear of the "evils of competition and rivalry". Since University powers were with-held, by 1915 the official name of the University had become Calgary College, although it was still known locally as the University of Calgary. Calgary College closed in 1915 due to the collapse of the real estate boom, continuing squabbles with the province and the beginning of the First World War.

Results 11 to 20 of 215