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Authority record

2nd Battalion, Calgary Highlanders

  • high
  • Corporate body

The 2nd Battalion (Bn.)of the Calgary Highlanders was authorized to be formed on 22 June 1940 as a part of the Reserve Army. The primary purpose of the Canadian Army's Reserve Units was to prepare soldiers for active service in the regular force. Recruits participated in two parades each week, with extra parades for officers and non-commissioned officers(NCO). A two-week training camp was held in the summer months at Camp Sarcee. Other training included Vernon Battle Drill School and Small Arms School at Gordon Head, B.C.. In May 1942, the 2nd Bn. was incorporated into the 41st Reserve Brigade of the Pacific Command. The 2nd Bn. sponsored Highland Flings to raise funds to provide the soldiers overseas with additional comforts and extra training equipment. By mid 1943 constant turnover in the reserve unit caused a recruiting crisis and as a result many veterans chose to volunteer again for reserve duty with the 2nd Bn.. The battalion organized homecoming festivities for the returning Highlanders on 24 November 1945. On 1 April 1946, the 2nd Battalion Calgary Highlanders was disbanded and redesignated as the Calgary Highlanders.

31st Canadian Infantry Battalion (Alberta)

  • glen

The Department of National Defence was created in 1923 by the National Defence Act which established one civil department in place of the previous Department of Militia and Defence, the Department of the Naval Service and the Air Board. The Canadian Forces Reorganization Act in 1968 unified the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force into a single service called the Canadian Armed Forces. The Department is responsible for the control and management of the Canadian Armed Forces, and all matters related to national defence establishments and the defence of Canada. The 31st Canadian Infantry Battalion (Alberta) was organized in Calgary on March 15, 1915, and came to a strength of 1,033. In the First World War it served in France and Belgium with the 6th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division from September 18, 1915 until the armistice.

4 Point Trucking Co-operative

  • PAA
  • Corporate body

The 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Limited (Ltd.) was formed in July 1963 in the Andrew, Alberta area. The membership of the association consisted of the Andrew, Lamont, St. Michael, Mundare, and Park co-operative associations. The purpose of the association was to provide trucking services to and from member co-operatives and any other businesses for the benefit of the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Limited, subject to the approval of the board of directors of the associations concerned. The head office of the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Ltd. was in the offices of the Andrew Co-operative Association, and the manager of the Andrew Co-operative Association was the manager for the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Ltd.

4-H Canada. Angus Ridge Chapter. Angus Ridgette Multiclub

  • WET
  • Corporate body

4-H is an international, community, non-profit organization for young people. 4-H clubs often formed special clubs designed to appeal to female members. The Angus Ridgette Multiclub consisted of girls aged 12- 14 who lived in the district of Angus Ridge, south-east of Wetaskiwin. The Angus Ridgette Multiclub would meet monthly under the supervision of an adult leader and discuss issues important to teenage girls and plan activities. Activities included visiting seniors in old age homes, raising money for charity, trips to Edmonton, public speaking contests, summer camps and other activities. It is unclear when the group was created.

4-H Canada. Gwynne Chapter. Gwynnette Club

  • WET
  • Corporate body

4-H is an international community non-profit organization for young people. Starting in 1959, the 4-H chapter of Gwynne organized several clubs designed to appeal to female members. In 1959, the Gwynnette Home Decorating Club was organized, in 1960 the Garden Club was inaugurated, and in 1963 the Clothing Club was begun. The secretary's minutes were sent to the District Home Economist's office following each monthly meeting.

51st Battalion Association

  • PAA
  • Corporate body

The 51st Battalion Association was formed circa (ca.) 1918 and was located in Edmonton, Alberta. The association was composed of members of the 51st Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), which was formed circa (ca.) January 4, 1915 and served overseas during World War I. The association organized yearly reunions for the veterans. A.E. Goodwin was the secretary-treasurer during the years 1951-1970, and A.A. Allbright was president during 1965-1968.

51st Battalion Association

  • EDM
  • Corporate body
  • 1916-1975

Lt. Col. Reginald de Lotbinere Harwood, formerly of the 101st Regiment (Edmonton Fusiliers), was authorised to raised the 51st Battalion (edmonton's Own) in December 1914. In November 1914 the battalion was the first unit to occupy the Prince of Wales Armoury in Edmonton. Sixteen of the commissioned officers had risen through the ranks of the Fusiliers and some were veterans of the Boer War. the 51st Battalion embarked from Halifax on April 1, 1916 aborad the SS Olympic. In Britain the battalion was posted to the 12th Infantry Brigade of the 4th Division being organized at Bramshott Camp, but it was broken up to provide reinforcements for units already in action. Ultimately the 51st Ballaion was perpetuated by The Edmonton Regiment (now the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, 3 Batt. P.P.C.L.I.).

5th Trumpeter Swan Troop Boy Scouts

  • SPRA-0392
  • Corporate body
  • [ca. 1965]-unknown

Grande Prairie had an active Boy Scout movement in the 1960s as evidenced by this group of "Owls" and "Wolves" with their troop leaders. At that time a boy at 11 years of age could join as a Tenderfoot and aspire to eventually become a "Queen's Scout". The boys learned practical life saving skills following their motto, "Be Prepared" and as well performing community service projects.

76 Ranch

  • med
  • Corporate body

Sir John Lister-Kaye was the visionary behind the 76 Ranch. In the fall of 1884, Lister-Kaye purchased almost seven thousand acres from the CPR and Dominion at Balgonie, east of Regina. Finding success with that region of land, Lister-Kaye turned his attention to the region west of Calgary. He purchased 10,000 acres of land there from the CPR and Dominion and began to establish ten farms. Seven of them were, at intervals, west of the Swift Current district extending almost to Calgary, one on the plains of Rush Lake, another south of Swift Current, and the third near a CPR experimental farm at Gull Lake. Lister-Kaye began promoting his group of farms as the Alberta and Assiniboia Land, Stock and Coal Company, but without convincing investors of the value and a bad drought, the scheme was almost abandoned. In 1888, however, along with D.J (Joe) Wylie, Lister-Kaye set out for England to convince his investors that his business was worthwhile. Success was had, and a new syndicate known as the Canadian Agricultural Coal and Colonization Company (CACC Co.) was created on January 26, 1888. This company bought out Lister-Kaye's Blagonie holdings and took over his purchase agreement with the CPR and Dominion once the land was inspected by the investors and given approval. By the end of 1888 the sale was finalized and Lister-Kaye had made a fortune, and also became manager of the CACC Co. for five years. The 76 Ranch brand orginally came from the Powder River Ranch Company, an English-owned organization based in London, when Lister-Kaye purchased about 5800 cattle for his ten station farms. Since the cattle already bore the brand "76" the CACC Co. decided to maintain it, and that is why today the whole enterprise in the North-West is known as the "76" Ranch. Lister-Kaye imported many high-quality breeds - mares, Merino Ewes, rams, bulls, Yorkshire Boars, and pigs - and distributed them all throughout his enterprise. Young Englishmen, and some women, were recruited and sent to the North-West to begin constructing the farm buildings and farm the land. To capitalize on the success of his farms, Lister-Kaye came up with an idea that linked his farms together. He opened up butcher shops and slaughterhouses in Dunmore and Medicine Hat and a large meat packing plant in Calgary in order to sell the company's own beef, mutton, and pork. The idea to sell cheese and butter, however, failed. After reckless mistakes and decisions, Lister-Kaye was replaced as manager of the CACC Co. and Harper P. Clinto took over. The company's troubles, however, did not end. In 1890, a prarie fire started by sparks from a CPR engine trapped 2200 CACC Co. sheep who were grazing near Gull Lake. Most of them were pregnant and over half of them were killed or badly burned. Coyotes also heavily prayed on lambs and sheep. A bad hail storm in 1890 also destroyed the crops in the Swift Current region. D.H Andrews took over as cattle manager of the "76" in 1890 and the livestock from Swift Current moved to Rush Lake, and those at Gull Lake moved to the Crane Lake ranch. Plagued by financial troubles, the CACC Co. sold all of its holdings and assests in the North-West to a new London-based company, the Canadian Land and Ranch Company Ltd. (CL & R Co.). A.F Eden was chairman of the Board of Directors and D.H Andrews was made general manager of the company. Selling off livestock became a priority to make money and several employees were dismissed. Weather and low prices for wool made making money a tough practice, even though the new company managed to make healthy profits through consolidations. The company was dealt a mortal blow during the winter of 1906 - 1907 when two-thirds of their cattle herd died on the open range, and was only able to continue on until 1909 because of stored profits. In 1909, the company gave up ranching entirely, and sold its remainging holdings to the firm of Gordon, Ironsides and Fares of Winnipeg.

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