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Abasand Oils

  • paa

In 1930, Max W. Ball and associates Basil O. Jones and James McClave established Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products Limited to produce oil and refined products from the oil sands of the Athabasca region near Fort McMurray, Alberta. A charter was issued to Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products by the Federal Government on September 2, 1930; the head office of the company was located in Edmonton, Alberta. The company developed a process for the extraction of oil from the oil sands. The Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products was renamed Abasand Oils Limited in 1935. The company built a plant on land leased from the Federal Government on the banks of the Horse River, near Fort McMurray, Alberta; the plant opened in 1936. In 1943, the Federal Government took over operations at the Abasand Oils' plant under the <em>War Measures Act</em>. The plant was damaged by fire in 1945. The federal government abandoned the site in May 1946, and the rights and properties were returned to the Abasand Oils. The plant did not resume operations. In 1953, Abasand Oils subleased most of its oil sands holdings, but it was not until 1967 that it began to receive royalties. Abasand Oils became a subsidiary of Canadian Industrial Gas and Oil Limited, which dissolved in 1975.

Abbott, Lillian and John

  • glen

John Thomas Abbott, 1889-?, was born in Tottenham, London, England, the son of John Abbott, 1864-1937, and Edith Emma Sutton, 1870-1938. He emigrated with his family to Calgary, Alberta in the early 1890s. About 1895 the family moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA where his parents remained. John later moved to the Excel / Oyen district of eastern Alberta about 1915. In 1916 he married Lillian Marie Runnings, 1896-1990, originally from Detroit, Michigan. In the 1920s they moved to Martinez, California where John worked for the Tidewater Oil Company until about 1950. They had at least one son, John Robert Abbott, 1930-2002.

Abbott, Lloyd

  • RED

D. Lloyd Abbott was born in the Red Deer, Alberta district, the son of dairy plant supervisor William Reginald Abbott and his wife the former Margaret Eleanor Streatch. In 1958 he was a student in a diploma course in dairying at the University of Alberta. He farmed near Eckville, Alberta. He married Jacqueline Bell, and they had three children, Kimlee Anne, Lori, and Grant

Abbott, Sharon

  • jhse

Leslie Sharon Cantor Abbott is a graduate of the University of Alberta, and works as a graphic artist. She is the daughter of Dr. Max and Edith Secter Cantor of Edmonton. She is divorced from Mr. Daniel Charles Abbott of Winnipeg, whom she married in 195? at the Beth Shalom synagogue. Her brother is Paul Cantor of Toronto. She has two children, Laurence and Jennifer. Dr. Max Cantor was a professor of biochemistry at the University of Alberta, and served as Chief Coroner of the Province of Alberta for over 30 years. He won numerous citations and awards during his long and distinguished career. Her mother, Edith Cantor was an active volunteer, mostly with the University of Alberta, and an amateur actress, appearing in many Little Theatre productions.

Abell, Ted

  • paa

Edward (Ted) Howard Abell was born June 22, 1919 in Edmonton, Alberta, but was raised and educated in Calgary, Alberta. He attended the Western Canada High School in Calgary. Following graduation in 1937, he apprenticed at the Palace Bakery in Calgary, becoming a journeyman baker in 1939. After the Second World War started, Ted joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (R.C.A.F.), training as a pilot and then as a flying instructor. From 1941 to 1943, Ted was a flying instructor, and from 1943 to 1945 he was a flight lieutenant overseas. Following the war, Ted returned to the bakery for two years, and then worked for the City of Calgary for two years. Ted reenlisted with the R.C.A.F., serving in various capacities in Claresholm, Alberta, Comox, British Columbia, Cold Lake, Alberta, Edmonton, Namao, Alberta, Resolute Bay, Northwest Territories and Lancaster Park, Alberta. After retiring from the R.C.A.F. in June of 1964, Ted worked for the Department of the Provincial Secretary, Centennial Branch from 1964 to 1967 as the Centennial Officer on the Centennial Committee, which helped plan and promote Alberta's celebrations for Canada's 100th Birthday. He and wife Dorothy had one son, Ted, and six daughters, Ginger, Nancy (O'Hara), Joyce (Andre), Linda (Campbell), Shirley (Senger) and June (Leechuy). Ted died December 25, 1982.

Aberdeen School District No. 291

  • paa

Aberdeen School District Number (No.) 291 was formed on October 11, 1893 near Innisfail, Alberta. Specifically, it was located at Section 20, Township 35, Range 27, West of the 4th Meridian (20-35-27-W4). The first school board members included Alex McGillivary, W.L. Center, and Egerton Greer. H. A. Malcolm was hired as the first teacher and also fulfilled the duties of secretary-treasurer for the school board. In 1916 the school was moved to Section 29, Township 35, Range 27, West of the 4th Meridian (29-35-27-W4). The school was closed circa (ca.) 1957 and ministerial approval for sale of the school land to the Innisfail community was given ca. 1958.

Aberhart Memorial Sanatorium

  • paa
  • Corporate body

The Aberhart Memorial Sanatorium opened in 1952 in Edmonton, Alberta. The sanatorium treated tuberculosis patients until 1970 when management of the hospital transferred to the University of Alberta Hospital. The sanatorium offered 295 beds, and a large nurse's residence. Dr. H.H. Stephen was Medical Superintendent of the Sanatorium from 1952 to 1969.

Aberhart, William

  • paa
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William ("Bible Bill") Aberhart was born December 30, 1878 near Seaforth, Ontario; he was the son of William and Louisa (Pepper) Aberhart. He studied at Mitchell Model School, Chatham Business College, Seaforth Collegiate Institute and the Ontario Normal School in Hamilton, Ontario. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Queen's University in 1911; he accomplished this by correspondence beginning in 1907. In 1899, he taught at Morris School, near Wingham, Ontario. In 1901, he moved to Brantford, Ontario and taught at Central Public School; he was appointed principal of Central Public School in 1905. He was active in Brantford's Zion Presbyterian Church and for a time planned on entering the Presbyterian ministry. He married Jessie Flatt on July 29, 1902; they had two daughters, Khona Louise (Cooper), born November 1, 1903, and Ola Janette (MacNutt), born August 31, 1905. The Aberhart family moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1910, as Aberhart had accepted an offer from the Calgary School Board to become principal of Mount Royal College beginning in the spring of 1910. However, the school was not ready when he arrived so he became principal of Alexandra Public School. In the fall of 1910, with Mount Royal still not ready, he became principal of Victoria School. When ready, he did become principal of Mount Royal School and then in 1913 became the principal of King Edward School. From 1915 to 1935, Aberhart was principal of Crescent Heights High School. He taught bible classes at Trinity Methodist Church until 1916 and attended and taught classes at Grace Presbyterian Church until 1912. The Aberhart family then attended Wesley Methodist Church and Westbourne Baptist Church where Aberhart was eventually recognized as a lay minister and baptized on May 2, 1920. By 1918, Aberhart's bible classes we so popular and well attended, the classes were renamed the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference. In 1925, he was appointed Dean of the newly established Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute. Also beginning in 1925, Aberhart's Sunday afternoon bible lectures for the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference were broadcast over the radio; these became known as "Back-to-the-Bible Hour." In 1929, Aberhart established the Bible Institute Baptist Church. Beginning in 1932, influenced by personal experiences brought on by the Depression, Aberhart began to give serious thought and study to the social credit theories espoused by Major C.H. Douglas. In 1933, Aberhart began giving lectures on these theories, soon forming a Social Credit Study Group; other study groups formed across Calgary and the province. Aberhart organized the Douglas Social Credit League in 1933 (later the Alberta Social Credit League). Initially trying to work with United Farmers of Alberta to implement social credit theories, when this failed, Aberhart organized the social credit movement into a political party, and this Alberta Social Credit Party won the majority of seat in the 1935 provincial election. As leader of the Social Credit Party, even though he did not run, Aberhart was sworn in as Premier and Minister of Education on September 3; on November 3, 1935, a by-election was held in the electoral district of Okotoks-High River which Aberhart won by acclamation. On September 5, 1937, he was appointed Attorney General. He was reelected in 1940 for electoral district of Calgary. Suffering form illness, Aberhart and his wife traveled to Vancouver, British Columbia in April of 1943 to visit their daughters. William Aberhart died May 23, 1943 and was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Aberhart, William

  • UOFC
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William Aberhart was born on a farm near Kippen, Ontario on December 30, 1878 to William Aberhart Senior and Louisa Pepper. He attended Chatham Business College and received teacher training at the Mitchell Model School and the Ontario Normal School in Hamilton, Ontario. He also obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 1911. He taught in several schools in southern Ontario, becoming principal of the Central Public School in Brantford Ontario, before moving to Calgary in 1910. During his time in Brantford, Aberhart also preached in local churches and conducted Bible study classes. Although he grew up in a nominally Presbyterian household, Aberhart and his wife entered the Baptist faith when residing in Calgary. Between 1910 and 1915, Aberhart was principal of three public schools in Calgary: Alexandra, Mount Royal and King Edward. In 1915, he was appointed principal of Crescent Heights High School, a position that he held for twenty years. While in Calgary, he continued to preach in a number of churches and also held Bible study classes. In 1918 he founded the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference to promote Bible study in Calgary. His sermons and teachings were so popular that the Palace Theatre had to be rented to accommodate all who wished to participate. In 1925, he started broadcasting Sunday afternoon lectures on the radio called the "Back to the Bible Hour". These biblical lectures drew listeners from across the Canadian prairies and the adjacent U.S. states. In 1927 he was appointed Dean of the newly organized Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute. This institute served as a centre of worship and biblical studies, and also produced Aberhart's radio broadcasts. During this time, he was often known as "Bible Bill," in reference to his religious preaching. Aberhart became interested in politics in the 1930s as a result of the Great Depression. He particularly was interested in the 'social credit' theories of Scottish engineer Major C.H. Douglas which addressed the "discrepancy between the costs of production and the purchasing power of individuals." He founded the Social Credit League and began lobbying the Alberta government, held by the United Farmers of Alberta, to adopt some of the social credit policies. When this attempt failed, Aberhart organized Alberta's Social Credit League and the party won the 1935 Alberta provincial election by a landslide. Aberhart himself had not been a candidate in the election, but because he was the leader of the Social Credit League, he was proclaimed Premier of Alberta. He won a by-election in the electoral district of Okotoks-High River two months after being proclaimed Premier. From 1935-1943, Aberhart held the portfolios of Minister of Education and Attorney General. After the general election of 1940, Aberhart represented the multi-member electoral district of Calgary. During his tenure as Premier, Aberhart and the Social Credit government were successful in legislating its "prosperity certificate" program and also in making changes to Alberta's educational system and labour laws. They also established oil and gas conservation practices and provincial marketing boards. However, the Social Credit policies were not fully realized - attempts to change legislation pertaining to the administration of banks or operation of the newspapers in the province were unsuccessful. Although three bills were passed to amend legislation, the Supreme Court of Canada and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council ruled these bills unconstitutional. William Aberhart married Jessie Flatt of Galt, Ontario in 1902 and had two daughters, Ola Janet and Khona Louise. He died suddenly on May 23, 1943 while in Vancouver, British Columbia. A high school in Calgary and a long-term care facility in Edmonton are named in his honour.

Aberhart, William

  • glen-1
  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William "Bible Bill" Aberhart, 1878-1943, was born in Ontario. He studied at the Hamilton Normal School and was granted his BA from Queen's University in 1911. In 1902 he married Janet Jessie Flatt, 1878-1966, and they had two children, Ola (MacNutt), 1905-2000, and Khona (Cooper), 1903-2000. In 1910 they moved to Calgary, Alberta and Aberhart became a high school principal. He was principal of Crescent Heights High School, 1915-1935. He ran popular bible classes, and in 1925 began his Sunday afternoon radio broadcasts, called the "Back to the Bible Hour". In 1927 he opened the Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute, and two years later founded the Bible Institute Baptist Church. In 1932 he became interested in the monetary ideas of Major C.H. Douglas, who espoused state supervision of credit and dividend payments to citizens. He founded the Social Credit League, and in 1935 became the premier of Alberta when Social Credit swept the United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) government from power. The government was unable to implement Aberhart's proposed reforms because the legislation was disallowed by the federal government. Aberhart died in office. In 1974 the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated Aberhart as a National Historic Person. For further information see Bible Bill / David R. Elliott and Iris Miller. - Edmonton : Reidmore Books, 1987.

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