Showing 215 results

Authority record
University of Calgary Archives and Special Collections (UOFC)

Carter, David

  • UOFC
  • Person

The Very Reverend David John Carter was born April 6, 1934 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. He received his BA from the University of Manitoba in 1958 and his L.Th from St. John's College, Winnipeg in 1960. From 1965 to 1969 he was the Anglican Chaplain to the University of Calgary, Mount Royal Junior College and SAIT. He served on the University of Calgary Senate from 1971 to 1977 and was a member of the Honorary Degree Committee and Chancellor's Nominating Committee (1974). Mr Carter was named the Dean of Cathedral Church of the Redeemer (Anglican) in June, 1969, the youngest Anglican Dean in the world.

Doucette, A.L.

  • UOFC
  • Person

Andrew Leo Doucette, 1900-1974, was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. After receiving a BSc degree in Civil Engineering from Dalhousie University and Nova Scotia Technical College ca.1917-1920, he taught in rural Alberta schools and received his teaching certificate from the Edmonton Normal School in 1923. He continued teaching in Alberta, including at the Edmonton Normal School (1929-1932, 1940) and the Calgary Normal School (1938-1940), and was Rural School Inspector at Vegreville (ca.1932-1936). He also served in the Canadian Army from 1940-1946, attaining the rank of major. He received an MA degree from the University of Alberta in 1940, and a Doctorate in Education from Stanford University in 1947. He then served as Head of the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta, Calgary Branch and the Director of University of Alberta, Calgary from 1947-1960. From 1960-1961 he was Associate Dean of Education at University of Alberta, Calgary. He received a Doctor of Laws degree at The University of Calgary's first convocation after autonomy. During his years as an administrator, he worked strenuously to establish an autonomous University of Calgary. He also chaired or was a member of several education committees and conferences including the Western Canadian Conference on Teacher Education. He and his wife, Violet Thelen, had three children, Frank, Marjorie and Kay.

Heymann, Frederick G.

  • UOFC
  • Person
  • 1900-1983

Frederick G. Heymann was born in Berlin on December 24, 1900. He studied history, philosophy, economics and sociology at the Universities of Berlin, Göttingen, Heidelberg and Frankfurt. He received his PhD from the University of Frankfurt in 1922 and spent two years on postgraduate work with Werner Sombart, an historian of modern capitalism.

Heymann started his journalism career in 1925 as the assistant economic policy editor for Frankfurter Zeitung, a highly regarded newspaper in pre-Hitler Germany. In 1932 he moved to Czechoslovakia as head of the Prague editorial office. Heymann’s writing came under increasing criticism from the German legation as being too friendly to the Czech people and to Czechoslovak policy. In 1935 the office was taken over by the Nazis and Heymann moved on to the Bohemia, a local daily paper of which he was editor, chief editorial writer and diplomatic correspondent. Both of these positions involved intensive diplomatic travel and study of the politics, economies and history of Eastern European countries.

Several members of the Bohemia’s editorial staff were arrested in March 1939; although Heymann was questioned, he was subsequently let go. With the help of Dr. Zdenek Schmoranz from the Press Department in the office of the Prime Minister, Heymann was able to leave the country with his family, arriving in England in July 1939. He expected to travel on to Australia but the outbreak of the war prevented him from doing so, and also contributed to his 10-week stay in an internment camp on the Isle of Man.

Heymann took classes to become proficient in English and was eventually employed in 1941 by the British Ministry of Information. He wrote and edited articles and became the military correspondent for Die Zeitung, a German language paper sponsored by the Ministry. In 1944 he was hired by the United States Office of War Information, a position that enabled him to travel to Germany as a civilian editor for the illustrated weekly Heute. At the end of the war, Heymann and his family emigrated to the United States, arriving in New York in July 1946.

Once in America, Heymann taught history at high schools and pursued his life-long passion of research and writing. His first book was published in 1955, a major work on John Žižka and the Hussite Revolution. Between 1956-1958 he was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey and then was Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa 1958-1959. He joined the University of Calgary in 1959 as an associate professor of history, later serving as Head of the Department. Heymann was widely acknowledged as an authority on Czech history and would publish numerous articles, chapters and books, including George of Bohemia, King of Heretics (1965) and Poland and Czechoslovakia (1966). He retired from the University of Calgary in 1973 and was granted Professor Emeritus status for his outstanding scholarship and service.

Heymann and his first wife Edith had two children, Ruth Bean and Frank. Edith died in 1966. Heymann married his second wife Dr. Lili Rabel from the Department of Linguistics, University of Calgary, in 1969. He died in 1983.

Knudsen, Arthur W.

  • UOFC
  • Person

Arthur W. Knudsen was a professor of physics formerly of Washington, DC (in the 1950s), Geneva, Switzerland (ca. 1961), and Palo Alto, California (as of 1962). Professor Knudsen joined the staff in the Department of Physics at the University of Calgary as Senior Demonstrator ca. 1966 and remained until around 1984. His interest in precision modelling of reciprocating steam engines prompted the creation of these records.

Rothney Astrophysical Observatory

  • UOFC
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-present

The impetus for the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory (RAO) was initiated by Mr. Alexander (Sandy) Rothney Cross in December 1970 when he offered to donate a quarter section of land near Priddis, Alberta to the University. The Capital Resources Policy Committee passed a motion in June 1971 to proceed with a tree farm, animal farm and observatory on the land (the tree and animal farms never came to fruition). At Cross’s request, the observatory was named the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory to honour his mother’s side of the family. The site was officially opened in January 1972 by Dr. Margaret Burbidge, then Director of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, who unveiled the RAO’s sundial to symbolize the emergence of the University of Calgary onto the astronomical scene.

Cyril Challice, the Head of the Department of Physics, gave the initial planning of the site to Dr. T. Alan Clark who was joined in September 1971 by Dr. Eugene F.Milone; the two would become co-directors of the facility in 1975 and oversee its modest beginnings to a million-dollar research destination. The equipment first used was a 16 inch (.4 m) research grade telescope ordered by Clark from England with the initial photometer instrumentation obtained from the University of Virginia. This early photometer was modified over the years to become the Rapid Alternate Detection System (RADS), a system developed at the University of Calgary that allows for precision photometry through light cloud and that can adjust for variations in urban light reflections.

In the early 1980s, a Baker-Nunn satellite tracking camera was purchased for $.01 from the Cold Lake Air Force Base and transported to the RAO where it was installed in 1983. At the same time, Dr. George Coyne, then Director of the observatory at the Lunar and Planetary Lab in Tucson facilitated the acquisition of a 1.5 m metal mirror for the RAO. This became the basis of a $198,000 grant to build an alt-alt mounting for an infrared telescope to permit unblocked views of the entire sky and allow observations at the zenith where atmospheric distortion is minimal. The Cross Educational Foundation provided the funds for a building to house the apparatus and a dedication ceremony for the new 1.5 m, 8 tonne infrared telescope (IRT) was held on May 6, 1987. Dr. George Coyne, S.J., now Director of the Vatican Observatory, dedicated the telescope; Mr. Cross officially cut the ribbon. The telescope was renamed the ARCT or the Alexander Rothney Cross telescope to honour Sandy Cross who had donated more land and significant additional funding over the years. At the time, the RAO was Canada’s only dedicated infrared telescope facility, with its advantage of altitude and extreme dry air conditions that allowed for clear observations.

The 1.5 m mirror was replaced in 1993 by a new generation 1.8 m honeycomb mirror created in the Optical Sciences Centre of the University of Arizona. The Astrophysical Research Consortium at the Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico had offered in the late 1980s to fund ½ the costs of polishing the mirror in return for its short-term usage. Dr. Alan Clark developed the design for the mounting and oversaw its construction; first light was achieved through the newly upgraded 1.8 m telescope in January, 1996. A year later, the RAO celebrated its 25th anniversary.

In 2001, Dr. Milone submitted a grant to build a Visitor’s Centre at the site in order to expand outreach and teaching capabilities. The $400,000 submission was successful; the new Visitor’s Centre and teaching facility was official opened in 2005. Dr. Milone stepped down as Director of the RAO on September 1, 2004. Dr. Rene Plume became Acting Director for a year until Philip Langill was named Director.

The University of Calgary Faculty Association

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

TUCFA is the academic staff association and bargaining unit for the University of Calgary faculty members. It succeeded the Association of Academic Staff at the University of Alberta, Calgary (AASUAC) following the University's autonomy in 1966. The Association was incorporated under "The Universities Amendment Act", 1981, having existed as a society under the Societies Act before that. TUCFA's mandate is: to promote the independence and freedom of teaching, thought and research within the University; to foster academic community among Association members; to promote joint interests and welfare of academic staff associations through CAFA (Confederation of Alberta Faculty Associations) and CAUT (Canadian Association of University Teachers); and to collaborate with other bodies on the provincial, national and international level whose interests are similar.

The University of Calgary History collection

  • uofc

The University of Calgary History collection is the result of work carried out by various researchers on the history of the university. This includes research done by Harry Sanders under the direction of Donald Smith, Department of History and funded by a Special Projects grant; and research conducted by Robert Bott for the 25th Anniversary Visions book.

Thompson, Dixon

  • uofc
  • Person
  • 1942-2006

Dixon A.R. Thompson was born in Pincher Creek Alberta in 1942. He received a BSc (Chemistry) from the University of Alberta in 1964 and a PhD (Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry) from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1970. He was a Science Advisor for the Science Council of Canada from 1971-1973 and a member of the Symons Commission on Canadian Studies from 1973-1974. He also worked extensively as a consultant on environmental management and design matters for the Alberta Wheat Pool, Alberta Natural Gas, as a member of the Oldman River Basin Management Panel for the Environment Council of Alberta (1978-1980) and as Chair of the City of Calgary’s Scientific Review Panel on Water Fluoridation (1997-1998)

He was a member of the Faculty of Environmental Design from 1973 until his death, starting first as a Senior Demonstrator and becoming full professor in 1981. Following from his work with the Symons Commission, Thompson was appointed as a member of the General Faculties Council ad hoc Committee on Canadian Studies. The committee reported back to GFC in 1977. Thompson also served as Program Director of Environmental Science (1979-1983), Program Director, Industrial Design (1988-1990), and as Associate Dean (Academic) (1997-1998).

Thompson had extensive international experience as a visiting fellow for the Centre of Environmental Studies at the University of Melbourne (1980) and as Calgary Coordinator of the exchange project with Huaraz, Peru (1988-1995). He taught courses in environmental chemistry and environmental management to the OLADE program in Quito, Ecuador (1997-2006) and was a guest lecturer in Mexico, Venezuela, Costa Rica and Nepal. Thompson was also project leader and lecturer in Colombia for a four month training program on resource and environment management at a post-graduate level.

Thompson died in Victoria, B.C. in 2006.

University of Alberta

  • uofc
  • Corporate body

In 1906 the province passed an act authorizing the establishment of a University in Alberta. A Commission was appointed to determine the site and Edmonton was chosen as the University city. Dr. Henry Marshall Tory became the first president when the University first opened its doors in September, 1908. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences staff consisted of William H. Alexander (Professor of Classics), Luther H. Alexander (Professor of Modern Languages), Edmund K. Broadus (Professor of English) and William M. Edwards (Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering). A Board of Governors was set up in 1910 to administer the financial responsibilities of the University with the Senate to administer all academic matters. Some decentralization of University academic studies occured in 1931 when first year courses were taught through Mount Royal College and again in 1946 when the Calgary Branch of the University of Alberta opened. The Board of Governors and Senate at the University of Alberta in Edmonton continued to administer the Calgary Branch until 1965 when the government conceded autonomy in most academic and financial affairs for Calgary. The University of Alberta and the University of Calgary became separate entities in 1966 when full autonomy was accorded to Calgary.

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