Showing 229 results

Authority record
University of Calgary Archives

Alberta Library Network

  • uofc

The Alberta Library Network was a networking initiative among university libraries in the early 1980s. Alan MacDonald represented The University of Calgary and was responsible for preparing the document, "Principles and Considerations for Implementing an Alberta Library Network," which was presented to the Alberta Network Assembly in June 1982. Although this initiative was not implemented, the drive to network still exists and continues to reappear under different names.

Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, Local 52

  • uofc

Alberta Union of Provincial Employees represents a large number of government and board employees throughout the province. For administrative purposes, AUPE designates each department or unit a local number. The Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, Local 52 is the sole bargaining agent for The University of Calgary support staff and was formed by an enactment of the Alberta legislature on June 14, 1976. Previously, The University of Calgary's support staff were served by the Civil Service Association of Alberta. Local 52 is autonomous within the structure of AUPE and bargains independently within AUPE's constitution. The Local consists of over 2000 salaried and casual members and is administered by four chapters which each elect an executive to look after the chapter's interest. Local 52's chapters are Operational/Administrative, General, Specialist/Advisor, and Trades/Technical. These chapters reflect the job families staff are classified under. Representatives to Local 52 Council are elected by the chapters, and the Local executive is elected from among the members of the Council.

Armstrong, Herbert Stoker

  • uofc

Herbert Stoker Armstrong was the first President of the University of Calgary. After serving as Dean of the Arts and Science Faculty at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, he came to the University of Alberta as Professor of Geology and Dean of the new Faculty of Science in 1962. He was appointed Vice-President (Academic) in 1963, and in 1964 became the first President of the University of Alberta at Calgary. When The University of Calgary received autonomy in 1966, he assumed the dual role of President and Vice-Chancellor, which he held until 1968.

Association of the Academic Staff of the University of Alberta, Calgary (AASUAC)

  • uofc

In 1936 a Faculty Relations Committee was created by presidential appointment to act as liaison between the administration and the academic staff at the Calgary Branch of the University of Alberta. The appointment of the FRC came into effect in 1939 and annual staff meetings were iniated in 1940. A constitution was not in place until 1945 when it was agreed that the FRC would now act as the executive to the Association of Teaching Staff of the University of Alberta (ATSUA). The mandate, as laid out in the constitution, was to foster academic fraternity and to protect the independence and freedom of teaching, thought and research. Every full time member of the academic staff was a member. In 1949 the administrative procedures were reviewed and a new constitution was in place in 1950 by which the executive regularly elected by ATSUA was recognized as the liason agency and the FRC ceased to exist. The name was changed again twice: in 1959 to Association of Academic Staff of the University of Alberta (AASUA); in 1962 to Association of Academic Staff of the University of Alberta, Calgary (AASUAC).

Carter, David

  • UOFC
  • Person

The Very Reverend David John Carter was born April 6, 1934 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. He received his BA from the University of Manitoba in 1958 and his L.Th from St. John's College, Winnipeg in 1960. From 1965 to 1969 he was the Anglican Chaplain to the University of Calgary, Mount Royal Junior College and SAIT. He served on the University of Calgary Senate from 1971 to 1977 and was a member of the Honorary Degree Committee and Chancellor's Nominating Committee (1974). Mr Carter was named the Dean of Cathedral Church of the Redeemer (Anglican) in June, 1969, the youngest Anglican Dean in the world.

Doucette, A.L.

  • UOFC
  • Person

Andrew Leo Doucette, 1900-1974, was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. After receiving a BSc degree in Civil Engineering from Dalhousie University and Nova Scotia Technical College ca.1917-1920, he taught in rural Alberta schools and received his teaching certificate from the Edmonton Normal School in 1923. He continued teaching in Alberta, including at the Edmonton Normal School (1929-1932, 1940) and the Calgary Normal School (1938-1940), and was Rural School Inspector at Vegreville (ca.1932-1936). He also served in the Canadian Army from 1940-1946, attaining the rank of major. He received an MA degree from the University of Alberta in 1940, and a Doctorate in Education from Stanford University in 1947. He then served as Head of the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta, Calgary Branch and the Director of University of Alberta, Calgary from 1947-1960. From 1960-1961 he was Associate Dean of Education at University of Alberta, Calgary. He received a Doctor of Laws degree at The University of Calgary's first convocation after autonomy. During his years as an administrator, he worked strenuously to establish an autonomous University of Calgary. He also chaired or was a member of several education committees and conferences including the Western Canadian Conference on Teacher Education. He and his wife, Violet Thelen, had three children, Frank, Marjorie and Kay.

Heymann, Frederick G.

  • UOFC
  • Person
  • 1900-1983

Frederick G. Heymann was born in Berlin on December 24, 1900. He studied history, philosophy, economics and sociology at the Universities of Berlin, Göttingen, Heidelberg and Frankfurt. He received his PhD from the University of Frankfurt in 1922 and spent two years on postgraduate work with Werner Sombart, an historian of modern capitalism.

Heymann started his journalism career in 1925 as the assistant economic policy editor for Frankfurter Zeitung, a highly regarded newspaper in pre-Hitler Germany. In 1932 he moved to Czechoslovakia as head of the Prague editorial office. Heymann’s writing came under increasing criticism from the German legation as being too friendly to the Czech people and to Czechoslovak policy. In 1935 the office was taken over by the Nazis and Heymann moved on to the Bohemia, a local daily paper of which he was editor, chief editorial writer and diplomatic correspondent. Both of these positions involved intensive diplomatic travel and study of the politics, economies and history of Eastern European countries.

Several members of the Bohemia’s editorial staff were arrested in March 1939; although Heymann was questioned, he was subsequently let go. With the help of Dr. Zdenek Schmoranz from the Press Department in the office of the Prime Minister, Heymann was able to leave the country with his family, arriving in England in July 1939. He expected to travel on to Australia but the outbreak of the war prevented him from doing so, and also contributed to his 10-week stay in an internment camp on the Isle of Man.

Heymann took classes to become proficient in English and was eventually employed in 1941 by the British Ministry of Information. He wrote and edited articles and became the military correspondent for Die Zeitung, a German language paper sponsored by the Ministry. In 1944 he was hired by the United States Office of War Information, a position that enabled him to travel to Germany as a civilian editor for the illustrated weekly Heute. At the end of the war, Heymann and his family emigrated to the United States, arriving in New York in July 1946.

Once in America, Heymann taught history at high schools and pursued his life-long passion of research and writing. His first book was published in 1955, a major work on John Žižka and the Hussite Revolution. Between 1956-1958 he was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey and then was Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa 1958-1959. He joined the University of Calgary in 1959 as an associate professor of history, later serving as Head of the Department. Heymann was widely acknowledged as an authority on Czech history and would publish numerous articles, chapters and books, including George of Bohemia, King of Heretics (1965) and Poland and Czechoslovakia (1966). He retired from the University of Calgary in 1973 and was granted Professor Emeritus status for his outstanding scholarship and service.

Heymann and his first wife Edith had two children, Ruth Bean and Frank. Edith died in 1966. Heymann married his second wife Dr. Lili Rabel from the Department of Linguistics, University of Calgary, in 1969. He died in 1983.

Knudsen, Arthur W.

  • UOFC
  • Person

Arthur W. Knudsen was a professor of physics formerly of Washington, DC (in the 1950s), Geneva, Switzerland (ca. 1961), and Palo Alto, California (as of 1962). Professor Knudsen joined the staff in the Department of Physics at the University of Calgary as Senior Demonstrator ca. 1966 and remained until around 1984. His interest in precision modelling of reciprocating steam engines prompted the creation of these records.

Roman, Zoltan

  • uofc
  • Person

Zoltan Roman was born in Miskolo, Hungary on 7 June 1936. He arrived in Canada in 1957 and became a naturalized Canadian in 1962. Mr. Roman earned his BMus in 1962 in British Columbia and his MA and PhD in Toronto in 1962 and 1965 respectively. He played with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in 1959-1960. In 1966, Zoltan Roman began his career at the University of Calgary as an Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. By 1969 he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Music. He became an Associate Professor in the Department of Music in 1971 and then a full Professor in 1978. Mr. Roman served as an Administrative Officer for the Faculty of Fine Arts in 1972-1973 and Administrative Officer (Planning) 1975-1980. He was also the Associate Dean for the Faculty of Fine Arts from 1981-1986. Zoltan Roman was made Professor Emeritus in 1992 for the Department of Music. In 1977-1978, he held a Killam Resident Fellowship to complete a comprehensive annotated bibliography on the scholarly literature on the life and music of Anton von Webern. Mr. Roman was the president of the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the American Musicological Society from 1985-1987 and has served as a board member of the Internationale Gustav Mahler Gesellschaft and the International Webern Society. In 1983, he became co-editor of "Periodica Musica." Mr. Roman has edited several vocal works for the critical collected works of Gustav Mahler.

Results 1 to 10 of 229