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Personne/organisme
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City of Calgary. Office of the Mayor

  • ccg
  • Collectivité

Ralph Klein was elected Mayor of Calgary on 1980 October 15, succeeding Ross Alger. He was sworn in October 27. His platform was the creation of good communications between City Hall and taxpayers, and the funding of "essential services first and desirable services last". He was an active proponent of increased participation by the public in civic government, and initiated an open-door policy in his office. He also organized "Town Hall" meetings in each of Calgary's 14 Wards in an attempt to bring community members face to face with City staff to deal with issues and problems. He favoured using task forces to handle various issues. While Mayor, Klein also hosted a weekly open-line radio show. Under Ralph Klein, Rod Love served as Executive Assistant, Kay Hicks as Executive Secretary and Gerry Belanger as the Mayor's personal secretary. For more information regarding Ralph Phillip Klein's biography, please link to the City of Calgary Archives homepage and click on the "fonds level descriptions" link.

Canada Land and Irrigation Company

  • med
  • Collectivité

The Canada Land and Irrigation Co. Ltd. was formed in 1906, by Guy Tracey Robins of the Robins Irrigation Co. of London, England. An agreement was made to purchase 380,573 acres east of the Bow and Oldman River junctions, south of the CPR mainline. The Southern Alberta Land Company was formed in 1906 to carry out construction of a major irrigation project; construction costs estimated over $1,000,000.00 were to take place over a 10 year period. The completion of land sales were estimated to take 15 years. The land was found to be unsuitable for irrigation however, so agreement was made to purchase land further west of the Bow River and around Suffield. Construction began in 1909, but the company was plagued by financial problems, dam washouts and engineering mistakes. It went into receivership in 1914, and construction virtually stopped during WWI. In 1917, the receiver arranged a merger between the South Alberta Land Company and its subsidiary the Canadian Wheat Lands Ltd., and the bankrupt Alberta Land Co. Ltd. which held land adjacent to that of the South Alberta Land Co. A new company, named the Canada Land and Irrigation Co. Ltd. was formed. Sales of land began in 1918, and two reservoirs, the Little Bow Reservoir and Lake McGregor, were completed in 1919. Water was first delivered in 1920. The post war depression caused the company to again go into receivership in 1924, as it was unable to pay its debts. At that time, it had spent $15,000,000.00 on the project. In 1927, the company cleared its debt to the government by giving up land and reducing its holdings to 130,000 acres. More land was forfeited in 1941. In 1950, the system which had been named the Bow River Irrigation Project, was sold and the company ceased operations.

Canadian Bank of Commerce

  • glen-541
  • Collectivité
  • 1867-1961

The Bank of Canada, incorporated in 1858, became the Canadian Bank of Commerce in 1867. It took over several smaller banks including the Gore Bank in 1869 and the Standard Bank of Canada in 1928. In 1906 Sir Edmund Walker, 1848-1924, chairman of the bank, took a tour of western Canada, during which he took these photographs. Many of them feature bank buildings built by the Commerce and its competitors. In 1961 the Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Imperial Bank of Commerce merged to form the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

Alberta. Ministry of Education

  • paa
  • Collectivité

Dates of founding and/or dissolution:
The Department of Education of the Government of Alberta was a continuation of the Department of Education of the previous Northwest Territories government. The territorial department was founded by the School Ordinance in 1901. When the Province of Alberta was founded in 1905, the Department of Education continued to function under the authority of the <em>School Ordinance</em>. In 1922, the <em>School Ordinance</em> was repealed and superseded by <em>The Department of Education Act </em>(R.S.A. 1922 c. 16) and <em>The School Act </em>(R.S.A. 1922 c. 51). The Department of Education was dissolved May 27, 1999 by means of Order in Council 243/99 under the authority of the <em>Government Organization Act</em>. <em> Functional responsibility</em>: The Department of Education was responsible for the planning, development and implementation of the education system in Alberta. At the time that the department was created, it was responsible for all kindergarten schools, public and separate elementary and secondary schools, normal schools, teachers' institutes, and the education of physically and mentally handicapped children. The department was responsible for overseeing and approving the creation of school jurisdictions, approving the establishment of schools by school boards, inspection of schools, development of a standardized curriculum, overseeing the financing and administration of school jurisdictions, and overseeing the building of school facilities. The department also certified teachers who wished to work in Alberta and who had received their training outside the province. In 1922, technical and commercial schools came under the jurisdiction of the Minister of Education. Technical and vocational education programs were often provided by means of agreements between the Province and the Government of Canada, which used Alberta post-secondary technical institutes to provide federal technical training programs. The Minister was also made responsible for the licensing of private commercial and correspondence schools. In 1925, an amendment to the <em>School Act</em> allowed school boards to establish public junior colleges affiliated with the University of Alberta. As a consequence, the department became involved in post-secondary education provided through public colleges. Until 1969, public junior colleges were operated by school boards or consortia of school boards. With the passage of the <em>Colleges Act</em> in 1969, all public junior colleges became board-governed institutions. Between 1969 and 1971, the department's role in the funding and administration of public colleges was mediated through the Colleges Commission. The Minister was responsible for the administration of the <em>University Act</em> from the time it was first passed in 1910, though the department was not directly involved in the operations of the University of Alberta. The department provided capital and operating grants to the university, which was administered by its Board of Governors. In 1966 the department's relationship with the province's universities was clarified through the new <em>Universities Act.</em> This act created the Universities Commission, through which the department's interaction with the province's public universities was mediated. The department administered programs that provided financial assistance for the secondary and post-secondary education of the children of veterans of the First and Second World Wars. Financial assistance programs for university and college students, administered through the Students Assistance Board (renamed the Students Finance Board in 1971), were the responsibility of the department. In late 1971, responsibility for all post-secondary education, the Colleges Commission, the Universities Commission, and the Students Finance Board was transferred to the new Department of Advanced Education by means of a series of administrative transfers. <em>Predecessor and successor bodies</em>.: The predecessor of the Department of Education of the Province of Alberta was the Department of Education of the Government of the Northwest Territories. When the Department of Education was dissolved in 1999, its functions were divided between two new ministries. Responsibility for school buildings was transferred to Alberta Infrastructure. All other functions were transferred to Alberta Learning. <em>Administrative relationships</em>: The Department of Education reported to the Legislative Assembly through the Minister of Education. The Minister also passed to the Legislative Assembly the annual reports of the semi-independent agencies that reported to him until 1971, the Students' Finance Board, the Colleges Commission and the Universities Commission. <em>Administrative structure</em>: For the first thirty years of the department's operation, its activities were focused on overseeing the establishment, operation and alteration of school divisions, the inspection of schools and classrooms, ensuring an adequate supply of teachers, and overseeing the business activities of school jurisdictions. By 1917, the department's administrative structure had largely taken the shape it was to have for the next thirty years. The main components of the department were the school inspectorate, the province's Normal Schools, the School Libraries and Free Readers Branch (later re-named the School Book Branch), the School Debenture Branch, the Chief Attendance Officer, and the Provincial Board of Examiners. In 1919 a number of new positions were established, including the Supervisor of Schools, the Registrar, the Director of Technical Education, the Supervisor of Schools, and the Secretary of the department. The first major re-organization of the department took place in 1945. The administrative structure of the department became more hierarchical and the core functions of school supervision and administration were reorganized into two new divisions under the Chief Superintendent of Schools and the Director of School Administration, respectively. The heads of the Technical Education, Correspondence School, and the School Book branches continued to report directly to the Deputy Minister. Significant reorganizations of the department occurred in 1970, 1975, 1984, 1987, 1990, 1994 and 1997. In 1997, the Department of Education became the Ministry of Education. The Ministry was made up of three entities, the Department of Education (which continued the functions and activities of the previous department), the Education Revolving Fund, and the Alberta School Foundation Fund. This structure remained the same until the dissolution of the Ministry of Education on May 27, 1999. The various functions have included: the inspection and supervision of schools, the education and certification of teachers, curriculum development, financing the school system, supervising the operations of school jurisdiction administrations, overseeing construction of school facilities, providing technical and vocational education programs, the education of special needs students, providing educational programs in languages other than English, student testing, statistics and research in support of policy development, approving, developing and distributing appropriate text and reference books, post-secondary financial assistance programs, and the enforcement of compulsory attendance. A number of semi-independent agencies reported to the Minister of Education. These agencies included the Students' Finance Board (1953-71), the Board of Post-Secondary Education (1967-69), the Universities Commission (1966-71), and the Colleges Commission (1969-71). <em>Names of chief officers:</em>Ministers of Education: Alexander C. Rutherford 1905-10; Charles R. Mitchell 1910-12; John R. Boyle 1912-18; George P. Smith 1918-21; Perren E. Baker 1921-35; William Aberhart 1935-43; Solon E. Low 1943-44; R. Earl Ansley 1944-48; Ivan Casey 1948-52; Anders O. Aalborg 1952-64; Randolph H. McKinnon 1964-67; Raymond Reierson 1967-68; Robert C. Clark 1968-71; Louis D. Hyndman 1971-75; Julian G.J. Koziak 1975-79; David T. King 1979-86; Patrick N. Webber 1986; Nancy J. Betkowski 1986-88; James F. Dinning 1988-92; Halvar C. Jonson 1992-96; Gary G. Mar 1996-99

Alberta. Executive Council

  • paa
  • Collectivité

em> Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution: </em> The Human Resources Research Council was established by <em>The Alberta Human Resources Research Council Act</em> (S.A. 1967, chapter 36), on March 30, 1967. The Act was repealed May 19, 1976 by <em>The Statutes Repeal Act</em>, 1976 (S.A. 1976, chapter 51). <em> Functional Responsibility: </em> The motivation for the Human Resources Research Council resulted from the presentation of <em>A White Paper on Human Resources Development</em> by Premier Ernest Manning to the Alberta Legislature in March of 1967. The Human Resources Research Council was created as a corporation, to undertake educational, social, economic and other research that related to and affected the development and conservation of human resources in Alberta. The Council's objectives included to conduct or facilitate research in the human or social domain, to make known findings significant to shaping social policy, to develop plans, materials and procedures relating to human resource development, to assist all citizens in understanding emerging trends and problems related to human resources development, and to assist in the training of others engaged in similar research and development. The Council carried out studies categorized under a number of themes, including education, socio-economic opportunity, human behaviour and urban life. By means of a decision made by the Government of Alberta, the Council was to be phased out by August 31, 1972. <em> Administrative Relationships: </em> The Alberta Human Resources Research Council reported to the Legislative Assembly through the chairman, who was a member of the Executive Council. The Council was responsible to the Executive Council. <em> Administrative Structure: </em> The Alberta Human Resources Research Council was to be comprised of no more than ten members appointed by the Lieutenant Governor, two of whom were members of the Executive Council, and one who was the Director of the Alberta Human Resources Research Council. The Lieutenant Governor would appoint a chairman from the members from the Executive Council. <em> Names of the Corporate bodies: </em> The Alberta Human Resources Research Council was sometimes referred to by its acronym, HRRC. <em> Names of Chief Officers: </em> Chairmen of the Alberta Human Resources Research Council:;Raymond Reierson 1968; Robert C. Clark 1968-1971; Helen Hunley 1971-1972; Director of the Alberta Human Resources Research Council: *Dr. L. W. Downey 1968-1972

Dawson City Museum

  • dcm
  • Collectivité

The Dawson City Museum developed a walking tour in 1978 in an attempt to increase the range of their public programming. The walking tour was designed as a comprehensive tour of Dawson City's historic buildings and sites to give the visitor an overview of the town's history. Joy Brown was employed by the museum to conduct the tours. Parks Canada eventually took over walking tours around Dawson City, Yukon and the summer programmimg at the Dawson City Museum occasionally integrates street performances with these tours.

Alberta. Department of Sustainable Resource Development

  • paa
  • Collectivité

<em>Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution:</em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was established on March 19, 2001 through Order-in-Council 95/2001, pursuant to the <em>Government Organization Act</em>;<em>Functional Responsibility:</em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was established to provide greater direction and focus on the sustainability of Alberta's renewable natural resources. Sustainable Resource Development ensures that the benefits Albertans receive from public land and wildlife resources are sustained. Sustainable Resource Development's core businesses are forest protection, forest land and resource management, fish and wildlife management, rangeland management and land use disposition management. In the management of these resources, Sustainable Resource Development's objectives are to protect Alberta's forests and forest communities through the prevention and suppression of wildfires; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's forests and forest lands; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's fish and wildlife resources; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's rangelands; and to optimize the long-term benefits (environmental, social and economic) from public lands through effective, efficient disposition management. The Minister of Sustainable Resource Development is also responsible for the Natural Resources Conservation Board, the Surface Right Board and the Land Compensation Board. These Boards operate at arm's length from the Department and report directly to the Minister. <em> Predecessor and Successor Bodies: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was created from the functions and activities from the Department of Energy (previously the Department of Resource Development), the Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development and the Department of Environment. <em>Administrative Relationships: </em> The Minister of Sustainable Resource Development is a member of the Executive Council. <em> Administrative Structure: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development is comprised of four divisions: Forest Protection, Fish and Wildlife, Land and Forest, and Public Lands. In the fall of 2003, these divisions became Fish and Wildlife, Forest Protection, Public Lands and Forests, and Strategic Forestry Initiatives. These divisions are supported by Communications, Human Resources, Policy and Planning, and Strategic Corporate Services. <em> Names of the Corporate bodies: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development is also often referred to as Alberta Sustainable Resource Development. <em> Names of Chief Officers: </em> Ministers of Sustainable Resource Development:;Mike Cardinal 2001-

Alberta. Executive Council

  • paa
  • Collectivité

<em>Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution:</em> Alberta's first Premier, Alexander Cameron Rutherford, was appointed on September 9, 1905 by Alberta's Lieutenant Governor George H.V. Bulyea. <em>Functional Responsibility: </em> No provision is made for the Office of the Premier in <em>An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta,</em> more commonly known as <em>The Alberta Act</em>, which came into force September 1, 1905. The position of Premier is in many respects more a matter of convention and tradition. The leader of the political party holding the majority in the Legislative Assembly is designated Premier by the Lieutenant Governor. The Office of the Premier provides the Premier with administrative assistance; this includes scheduling his appointments and taking calls from the public. The Office of the Premier is coordinated by a Chief of Staff, who oversees the staff required to run the Office. The Public Affairs Bureau reports to both the Office of the Premier and the Executive Council Office. <em> Predecessor and Successor Bodies: </em> Prior to the establishment of Alberta as a province and the appointment of a Premier of Alberta, Sir Frederick W.A.G. Haultain served as the first and only Premier of the Northwest Territories, from 1897 to 1905. <em> Administrative Relationships: </em> The Premier is appointed by the Lieutenant Governor. The Office of the Premier reports to the Premier. <em>Administrative Structure: </em> In 2003, the Office of the Premier was comprised of a Chief of Staff, a Deputy Chief of Staff, a Director of Communications, a Director of Scheduling and a Southern Alberta Office of the Premier. <em> Names of the Corporate bodies: </em> The Premier is also known as the President of the Executive Council and has been known as the Chairman of the Executive Council. <em> Names of Chief Officers: </em> Premiers:;Alexander C. Rutherford, 1905-1910;Arthur L. Sifton, 1910-1917;Charles Stewart, 1917-1921;Herbert Greenfield, 1921-1925;John E. Brownlee, 1925-1934;Richard G. Reid, 1934-1935;William Aberhart, 1935-1943;Ernest C. Manning, 1943-1968;Harry E. Strom, 1968-1971;E. Peter Lougheed, 1971-1985;Donald R. Getty, 1985-1992;Ralph P. Klein, 1992-present

Town of Athabasca

  • ath
  • Collectivité

The Town of Athabasca lies on the south bank of the Athabasca River at a point 12 miles north of the geographical centre of Alberta. It is located on Highway No. 2, 133 km north of Edmonton in section 20-66-W4 and Census Division No.13. It is a hilly town, heavily wooded and interspersed with ravines. There has been a presence on this site since 1877. The hamlet of Athabasca Landing was incorporated as a village on June 5, 1905; incorporation as a town occurred on September 19, 1911. The word Landing was officially deleted on August 5, 1913.

County of Grande Prairie No. 1

  • SPRA-0300
  • Collectivité
  • 1951-present

In the late 1940s, the council of the Municipal District of Grande Prairie No. 127 "approached the Department of Municipal Affairs suggesting that a form of the County system be tried." (County of Grande Prairie No. 1 50th Anniversary Special Edition, Daily Herald Tribune) The County Act became law on July 1, 1950 and the County of Grande Prairie No. 1 was incorporated on January 1, 1951, the first and largest county in the province of Alberta. On February 22, 1951, eleven councilors were elected to the County of Grande Prairie: Lewis Hawkes, M.D. Kehr, G.R. Johnson, Bob Rycroft, Tom Warden, Alex Novlesky, Bernard Liland, Percy Johnson, Ed Williamson, A.E. Hawksworth, and James Smith. The first council meeting was held on March 8, 1951 and M.D. Kehr was elected chair.

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