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Persoon/organisatie

Wilk, Stephen

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The material in this collection was compiled by Reverend Stephen Wilk of Airdrie, Alberta for two books he wrote: Pioneers of the Faith, a History of the Airdrie United Church; and One Day's Journey, a General History of the Airdrie District. The latter was published by the Airdrie Community Improvement Club.

Canadian National Railway Company

The Canadian National Railway Company, Western Canada Region was created in 1985 with headquarters in Edmonton, Alberta.<br>;The Canadian National Railway Company, Western Canada Region participates in the Canadian National Railway Company's strategic planning process and contributes to the development and formulation of short and long-term business plans to ensure the viability of the enterprise. The Canadian National Railway Company, Western Canada Region is managed by the Office of the Senior Vice President, Western Canada. This office is responsible for formulating, developing and implementing an overall business plan for Western Canada in support of the Company's mission and in cognizance of important internal and external environmental factors peculiar to Western Canada and to the company as a whole, and for managing major changes evolving from the plan. The primary responsibilities include:<br>;a) ensuring the overall effectiveness of the Company's rail organization and providing a corporate overview of all activities in Western Canada; <br>;b) ensuring that all revenue opportunities are exploited, that expenses are controlled and that capital allocated is judiciously spent; <br>;c) developing, maintaining and enhancing effective relationships and communications with customers, the business community, governments at all levels, communities, special-interest groups, and the general public; <br>;d) providing the leadership required and the communications necessary for good relations with employees at all levels of Western Canada; <br>;e) undertaking initiatives and/or responses relating to special projects and issues throughout Western Canada; <br>;f) participating in and contributing to the development of strategic business plans, policies, and direction for the Canadian National Railway Company.<br>;Prior to 1985 Western Canada was divided into two regional operations: the Mountain and Prairie regions. In 1985 the two regions were combined to form the Western Canada region.<br>;The Senior Vice President, Western Canada reports directly to the President and Chief Operating Officer of the Canadian National Railway Company in Montreal, Quebec. Twelve senior officers report to the Senior Vice President, Western Canada.<br>;Past Senior Vice Presidents, Western Canada Region:<br>Ross Walker (1985-1994)<br>Richard Boyd (1994-2002)<br>Keith Creel (2002-2004)<br>Peter Marshall (2004- )<br>

Shaw, George Oswald

George Oswald Shaw was a resident of the Yukon for more than 40 years. He entered politics as a city councilor in Dawson City in 1950. He was a Territorial Councilor for 12 years from 1958 to 1970. In 1974 Shaw was appointed to the Federal Government team negotiating the Yukon Indian Land Claims (Yukon First Nations Land Claims). He moved to British Columbia in 1974.

Alberta. Department of Sustainable Resource Development

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<em>Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution:</em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was established on March 19, 2001 through Order-in-Council 95/2001, pursuant to the <em>Government Organization Act</em>;<em>Functional Responsibility:</em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was established to provide greater direction and focus on the sustainability of Alberta's renewable natural resources. Sustainable Resource Development ensures that the benefits Albertans receive from public land and wildlife resources are sustained. Sustainable Resource Development's core businesses are forest protection, forest land and resource management, fish and wildlife management, rangeland management and land use disposition management. In the management of these resources, Sustainable Resource Development's objectives are to protect Alberta's forests and forest communities through the prevention and suppression of wildfires; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's forests and forest lands; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's fish and wildlife resources; to enhance the economic, environmental and social contributions of Alberta's rangelands; and to optimize the long-term benefits (environmental, social and economic) from public lands through effective, efficient disposition management. The Minister of Sustainable Resource Development is also responsible for the Natural Resources Conservation Board, the Surface Right Board and the Land Compensation Board. These Boards operate at arm's length from the Department and report directly to the Minister. <em> Predecessor and Successor Bodies: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development was created from the functions and activities from the Department of Energy (previously the Department of Resource Development), the Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development and the Department of Environment. <em>Administrative Relationships: </em> The Minister of Sustainable Resource Development is a member of the Executive Council. <em> Administrative Structure: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development is comprised of four divisions: Forest Protection, Fish and Wildlife, Land and Forest, and Public Lands. In the fall of 2003, these divisions became Fish and Wildlife, Forest Protection, Public Lands and Forests, and Strategic Forestry Initiatives. These divisions are supported by Communications, Human Resources, Policy and Planning, and Strategic Corporate Services. <em> Names of the Corporate bodies: </em> The Department of Sustainable Resource Development is also often referred to as Alberta Sustainable Resource Development. <em> Names of Chief Officers: </em> Ministers of Sustainable Resource Development:;Mike Cardinal 2001-

Canada. Department of National Defence

The Department of National Defence was created in 1923 by the National Defence Act which established one civil department in place of the previous Department of Militia and Defence, the Department of the Naval Service and the Air Board. The Canadian Forces Reorganization Act in 1968 unified the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force into a single service called the Canadian Armed Forces. The Department is responsible for the control and management of the Canadian Armed Forces, and all matters related to national defence establishments and the defence of Canada. The Prairie Command Headquarters in Winnipeg received orders related to militia personnel in the districts of Calgary, Lethbridge, Fort Macleod, and Gleichen, Alberta, Kenora, Ontario and Cranbrook, British Columbia.

Wallace, Alexander

Alexander Robert Wallace was born in Buffalo, New York and naturalized as a Canadian citizen in Alberta in 1905. He grew up in Prescott, Ontario. Later, he lived in Gleichen, Alberta as a successful rancher. He lived there until around 1916-1917. In 1917, he opened the Wallace Drug Company in Peace River, Alberta with business partner and pharmacist, Samuel Hanna. In 1918, the store became the Hanna Drug Company, though Wallace still owned half of the company. He was a mason, a member of Peace River's town council and the local Exhibition Association. His mother was Cathrine Wallace and he had two brothers, Dave and George. He passed away May 29, 1938.

Millet West Mutual Telephone Company

The Millet West Mutual Telephone Company was incorporated under <em>The Companies Act</em> on April 9, 1934 and served the area around Millet, Alberta. Specifically, it included Townships 47 and 48, Ranges 24, 25, and 26, West of the 4th Meridian (47,48-24,25,26-W4). Alberta Government Telephones (AGT) assumed provision of communication services in the area circa (ca.) 1970 and the Millet West Mutual Telephone Company was dissolved in 1972.

Alberta. Department of Energy

<em> Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution: </em> The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board was established by the <em>Alberta Energy and Utilities Board Act</em>, which came into force on February 15, 1995. <em> Functional Responsibility: </em> The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board is a quasi-judicial agency that regulates Alberta's energy resources and utilities sector. The Board ensures that the discovery, development and delivery of Alberta's resources and utility services are fair, responsible and in the public interest. The Board is the result of the 1995 amalgamation of the Energy Resources Conservation Board and the Public Utilities Board, both of which had their own long histories in Alberta. The two continued to exist as legal entities. The Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board was established July 1, 1938, under <em>An Act for the Conservation of the Oil and Gas Resources of the Province of Alberta </em>(S.A. 1938, second session, chapter 1), which received assent November 22, 1938. The Board was founded on three principles: to encourage the development of petroleum and natural gas resources, to protect the public interest, and to ensure that these resources were not wasted. The purpose of the <em>Oil and Gas Resources Conservation Act</em> was for the conservation of oil resources and gas resources through the control or regulation of the production of oil or gas. To undertake this, the Act established the Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board. Included in the Board's responsibilities was the enforcement of regulations under <em>The Oil and Gas Wells Act</em>, 1931. The Board essentially had control over and regulated well-drilling and protection in the producing oil zones, with the objective of establishing the conservation of the petroleum and gas resources in Alberta. The Oil and Gas Conservation Board was established in 1957 under the <em>Oil and Gas Conservation Act</em> (S.A. 1957, chapter 63), effectively taking over from the Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board. The new Board performed the duties, powers and functions assigned to it by the Act as well any other act. The purpose of the new <em>Oil and Gas Conservation Act </em>was to effect the conservation of oil and gas resources (crude bitumen was added in 1968) and prevent their waste, as well as to secure safe and efficient oil field practices and provide owners with the opportunity of receiving their share of the production of any pool. The Board was also charged with administration of the <em>Gas Resources Preservation Act, 1956</em> and the <em>Turner Valley Unit Operations Act</em>. In addition, the Board advised the Minister of Mines and Minerals, particularly with regard to application for permits under the <em>Pipe Line Act</em>, 1958. The Board issued regulations and orders regarding drilling and producing operations; considered applications by operators; conducted inspections and studies; collected, summarized and published various data. To fulfill its duties, the Board conducted investigations, held hearings and prepared reports. The Board also assessed and taxed oil and gas properties, to obtain revenue to cover half of their expenses. The Energy Resources Conservation Board was established June 1, 1971 under the <em>Energy Resources Conservation Act</em> (S.A. 1971, chapter 30) as a continuation of the Oil and Gas Conservation Board. The <em>Energy Resources Conservation Act</em> was proclaimed January 1, 1972, and transferred administration of the </em>Pipe Line Act</em> (replaced by the <em>Pipeline Act</em>, 1975 in 1975), the <em>Coal Mines Regulation Act</em> (which was replaced by the <em>Coal Mines Safety Act</em> in 1975) and the <em>Quarries Regulation Act</em> to the Energy Resources Conservation Board. Assuming responsibilities from the Oil and Gas Conservation Board for the <em>Oil and Gas Conservation Act</em>, the <em>Gas Preservation Act</em> and the <em>Turner Valley Unit Operations Act</em>, the Board also administered the <em>Hydro and Electric Energy Act</em> and the <em>Coal Conservation Act</em>. The Pipe Line Division and the Mines Division from the Department of Mines and Minerals were transferred to the new Board. This brought all aspects of the energy resources for the province, including their conservation, regulation and transmission under one administrative authority. The Board was to ensure that the development of Alberta's energy resources was conducted in a responsible manner. The Board's expanded functions included: providing for the appraisal of reserves and productive capacity of energy resources and energy; providing for the appraisal of energy resource requirements; effecting the conservation of, and preventing the waste of, Alberta's energy resources; controlling pollution and ensuring environmental conservation in exploration, processing, development and transportation; securing safe and efficient practices in exploration, processing, development and transportation; providing for the recording and timely and useful dissemination of information; and providing agencies from which the Government of Alberta may receive information, advice and recommendations regarding energy resources. When there was objection to a proposed energy facility, the Board would convene public hearings to allow questions to be asked and evidence presented. The resource development and environmental management functions were connected to oil, gas, oil sands, pipelines, hydro and electric energy and coal. The administration of the <em>Public Utilities Board Act</em> was transferred from the Attorney General to the Minister of Energy in 1990 (A.R. 64/1990). The Public Utilities Board, just like the Energy Resources Conservation Board, had a long history in Alberta. The Board of Public Utility Commissioners was established in 1915 by the <em>Public Utilities Act</em> (S.A. 1915, chapter 6). At this early stage, the Board's jurisdiction extended to all enterprises owning or operating telegraph or telephone companies, railways or tramways, or furnishing water, gas, heat, light or power to the public, and to the Provincial Government Telephones. The Board heard applications concerning public utilities, as well as those concerning various matters beyond public utilities including municipal borrowings, municipal finance, tax arrears, the cancellation of subdivisions, municipal finances, the <em>Sale of Shares Act</em>, railway tariffs, and, from 1933 until 1969, the control of milk. For a number of years, these other matters occupied more time than did the regulation of public utilities. The Board conducted public hearings for contentious applications. In 1960, new legislation was passed, the <em>Public Utilities Board Act</em> (1960, chapter 85), which continued the Board of Public Utility Commissioners as the Public Utilities Board as of May 1, 1960. The Public Utilities Board was an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal, deriving much of its authority from the <em>Public Utilities Board Act</em>, and the <em>Gas Utilities Act</em> (S.A. 1960, chapter 37), along with many other statutes which imposed responsibilities on the Board. In 1969, the Alberta Milk Control Board was established under an amendment (S.A. 1969, chapter 70) to the <em>Milk Control Act</em>, to be under the administration of the Minister of Agriculture; this new Board assumed the responsibility for milk control from the Public Utilities Board. The Alberta Milk Control Board was renamed the Alberta Dairy Control Board in 1972. In 1970, the Public Utilities Board's responsibility for fixing compensation for some companies was transferred to the Right of Entry Arbitration Board. The Public Utilities Board assumed an administrative function under the <em>Natural Gas Rebates Act</em> (S.A. 1974, chapter 44). The Public Utilities Board was responsible for regulating the public utilities and gas utilities that fell under its jurisdiction, ensuring that customers received safe and adequate service at just and reasonable rates balancing the interests of consuming public and utility companies. The Public Utilities Board reported to Cabinet through the Minister of Telephones and Utilities from 1972 until 1975, the Attorney General from 1975 until 1990, at which point the responsibility was transferred to the Minister of Energy. In 1994, the Minister of Energy announced that the Energy Resources Conservation Board and the Public Utilities Board would be amalgamated into a single quasi-judicial regulatory agency. This new agency, to be called the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, would be able to provide a more streamlined and efficient regulatory process. New legislation, the <em>Alberta Energy and Utilities Board Act</em>, came into force on February 15, 1995. This new quasi-judicial agency regulated Alberta's energy resources and utilities sector, ensuring that the development of Alberta's energy resources was conducted in a responsible manner and that Albertans received safe and efficient utility service at fair and reasonable rates. In 1996, the Alberta Geological Survey became part of the Alberta Energy Utilities Board. The areas which the Board regulates are widespread, and include oil, natural gas, oil sands, coal, hydro and electric energy, pipelines, and transmission line development, and with regard to utilities, investor-owned natural gas, electric, and water utilities. Regulation is undertaken through the Board's four core functions: adjudication and regulation, applications, surveillance and enforcement, and information. <em> Predecessor and Successor Bodies: </em> The Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board was established to address the waste of gas concerns previously addressed by the Turner Valley Gas Conservation Board. The Board of Public Utility Commissioners took over wo

Glenbow Archives

The Glenbow Archives has created this artificial collection from orphaned calendars which are not properly part of the archival fonds in our holdings, but which still have research and exhibition value. Many of the calendars are advertisements (advertiques) for businesses in Calgary and southern Alberta. These would probably have been given out to their regular customers.

Alberta. Executive Council

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<em>Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution:</em> Alberta's first Premier, Alexander Cameron Rutherford, was appointed on September 9, 1905 by Alberta's Lieutenant Governor George H.V. Bulyea. <em>Functional Responsibility: </em> No provision is made for the Office of the Premier in <em>An Act to establish and provide for the Government of the Province of Alberta,</em> more commonly known as <em>The Alberta Act</em>, which came into force September 1, 1905. The position of Premier is in many respects more a matter of convention and tradition. The leader of the political party holding the majority in the Legislative Assembly is designated Premier by the Lieutenant Governor. The Office of the Premier provides the Premier with administrative assistance; this includes scheduling his appointments and taking calls from the public. The Office of the Premier is coordinated by a Chief of Staff, who oversees the staff required to run the Office. The Public Affairs Bureau reports to both the Office of the Premier and the Executive Council Office. <em> Predecessor and Successor Bodies: </em> Prior to the establishment of Alberta as a province and the appointment of a Premier of Alberta, Sir Frederick W.A.G. Haultain served as the first and only Premier of the Northwest Territories, from 1897 to 1905. <em> Administrative Relationships: </em> The Premier is appointed by the Lieutenant Governor. The Office of the Premier reports to the Premier. <em>Administrative Structure: </em> In 2003, the Office of the Premier was comprised of a Chief of Staff, a Deputy Chief of Staff, a Director of Communications, a Director of Scheduling and a Southern Alberta Office of the Premier. <em> Names of the Corporate bodies: </em> The Premier is also known as the President of the Executive Council and has been known as the Chairman of the Executive Council. <em> Names of Chief Officers: </em> Premiers:;Alexander C. Rutherford, 1905-1910;Arthur L. Sifton, 1910-1917;Charles Stewart, 1917-1921;Herbert Greenfield, 1921-1925;John E. Brownlee, 1925-1934;Richard G. Reid, 1934-1935;William Aberhart, 1935-1943;Ernest C. Manning, 1943-1968;Harry E. Strom, 1968-1971;E. Peter Lougheed, 1971-1985;Donald R. Getty, 1985-1992;Ralph P. Klein, 1992-present

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