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Photographs

Series consists of approximately 2,100 photographs taken by Hubert Hollingworth, documenting life in Edmonton during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. These include portraits, street scenes, buildings, and events.

Gay Alliance Towards Equity (GATE)

The Gay Alliance Toward Equality (GATE) formed ca. 1971-1972, originated as a University of Alberta student and faculty group lobbying to change laws discriminating against homosexuals. They were established as part of a wave of like groups across the continent responding to moves by the Canadian and American government to decriminalize homosexuality. Early GATE organizers were Michael Roberts, Bob Emery, Bill Booth, Tom Hutchinson, and M.A. Mumert. Incorporated under the Societies Act of Alberta in August, 1977, GATE’s first constitution was approved in 1978. GATE offices moved from the campus area to a downtown location in the late 1970’s, distancing the organization both physically and philosophically from a purely university activist organization into one more representative of the general gay community in Edmonton. The emphasis was now on social service to the gay community, including operating as a drop-in centre; hosting a Speakers’ Bureau; offering a phone-in line for information as well as a peer-counseling program; establishing a library; and planning social outings. Additionally, GATE continued to advocate for civil rights for gays and lesbians and served as a communications hub for members of Edmonton’s gay community. They also took part in national issues and organizations and some reorganization of the Executive was required by the mid-1980’s to facilitate the growth of the organization and the increase in types of activities. GATE’s activities were supported by funds generated by social events, contributions and an annual membership fee. However, due to financial mis-management and poor record keeping, GATE lost its Societies Act registration in 1986. A reapplication was made in 1987, but a new name had to be created as a condition for regaining their status. This was accomplished, and on November 4, 1987 GATE’s name was incorporated as the Gay and Lesbian Community Centre of Edmonton (GLCCE). (See Series 4.)

This series consists of GATE’s administrative records including their bylaws and constitution; financial statements; meeting minutes; and correspondence. In addition, there are copies of the GATE newsletter, two grant applications, and records related to GATE’s counselling program, and their social activities.

Youth Related Organizations / Resources

The history around Edmonton’s Gay youth related organizations and resources is not easily separated from the broader Gay and Lesbian organizations established for the entire Edmonton queer community, regardless of age. However, in recent years there is growing attention paid to the role of gay-straight alliances in schools, and creating safe spaces for LGBQT youth to express their sexuality. Historically in Edmonton, an organization for Gay and Lesbian Youth (GALYG) was offered as a program of McMan Youth Service and GATE (Gay Alliance Toward Equality); with the group producing their first newsletter in January 1988. The Pink Triangle Youth Group of Edmonton was formed ca. 1993 and operated out of the Gay and Lesbian Community Centre (GLCCE) of Edmonton. It offered space for young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 to gather for social interaction, education, and information sharing. Operating from November 1994 through September 1995 was a committee titled the Edmonton Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth working committee, which reported to the GLCCE Board of Directors. A program titled Youth Understanding Youth was established at the Centre ca. 2003, and once the GLCCE became the Pride Centre, similar meeting spaces and programs for youth continued to operate (under names including: Queer HangOut; Queer Youth CampOut; YouthSpace; and Pride Youth).

This is a small series, but one that may well expand as further accruals are received. The records consist of documents related to GATE’s Gay and Lesbian Youth Group; the Pink Triangle Youth Group of Edmonton; and other GLCCE youth initiatives. The bulk of the series consists of printed resources and reference materials related to counselling gay and lesbian youth; related youth studies and reports; and some correspondence. Included with the papers are three pink triangle t-shirts created for Pride ’92 week.

Clubs / Entertainment Venues

Gay clubs and bars operated openly in Edmonton from 1969 onwards. The first club established (ca. 1969) was called Club 70 and was located at 10242-106 street. It ceased operating in 1977, and at this same location was briefly the Cha Cha Palace (late 1970’s), Boots and Saddle Nightclub (ca. 1978-2010), and finally The Junction Bar and Eatery (2010-2012). Boots and Saddle also operated Boots: the Blue Room, Simply Boots, and the Garage Burger Bar (1997-2010). Flashback Nite Club opened first in 1976 at 11639 Jasper Avenue, and then relocated to 103rd Avenue and 104 street, closing ca. 1991. The Roost Club opened in September 1977, initially open for men only, but expanded to include women in the following year. Buddy’s Nite Club opened on 124 street in ca. 1994, remaining there for 15 years, and operated its final six years on Jasper Avenue, closing in 2015. Other LGQBT bars in Edmonton included Prism, for queer women, closing in 2010; Woody’s Pub on Jasper Avenue; Secrets Bar and Grill on 107th street; and Play Nightclub downtown. Another organization important as a social and entertainment outlet for Edmonton’s gay community was The New Royalist Social Society of Northern Alberta: The Imperial Sovereign Court of the Wild Rose, established in Edmonton in 1976 as part of an international Imperial Sovereign Court system. As well as providing entertainment for the gay community, the Imperial Court expanded its role to raise funds for gay and gay positive charities, and established a scholarship fund and the Star of Hope fund. Many of the gay bars and clubs hosted fundraising events or partnered with other organizations to raise monies for local community initiatives. [Some information provided by Rob Browatzke of The Junction.]

This series consists of records of some of the clubs described above, but predominantly Club 70; the Imperial Sovereign Court of the Wild Rose (ISCWR); and The Roost Nightclub. There are early administrative records for Club 70, as well as newsletters and photographs. ISCWR records include Coronation programs and information from the first coronation in 1976, and then further programs and records from courts held from 1985 to 2009. There are numerous event and promotion files for The Roost Nightclub, including monthly event calendars, broadsheets and flyers, news clippings and event posters. There are hundreds of photographs, as yet uncatalogued, primarily pertaining to events and functions held at the clubs. Included with the records were Roost Nightclub plaques and trophies.

Organizations

Many organizations have and do exist in Edmonton that have served or worked with the city’s LGBTQ community. Some organizations are national and international in their scope and membership, while others are local or provincial. Many of these organizations produced information pamphlets, newsletters and brochures, which were made available for interested persons to access at places like the GATE office, and later the Gay and Lesbian Community Centre and the Edmonton Pride Centre office. The range of interests and foci represented by these organizations is vast, from the very specific to the broad (for example the Northern Titans Bowling Tournament to organized religious bodies such as the United Church of Canada). There are numerous files of information gathered from AIDS organizations across Canada and internationally, as well as files relating to other varied organizations, both extant and extinct.

This series consists of the records of an array of organizations, and have been arranged in the following broad geographical sub-series: Organizations – Alberta; Alberta – Edmonton; Alberta - Calgary; British Columbia; Manitoba; Maritimes; Ontario; Quebec; Saskatchewan; Australia; Europe; and the U.S.A. Within these geographical headings, the files are arranged alphabetically by file title (this often being the title of the specific organization represented). The records consist primarily of published brochures or newsletters; and an assortment of printed information including news clippings, articles, news releases, and general correspondence. While some files have a lot of information, others are skimpy in their content. However, the range of organizations represented in this series, and the span of years captured, provides valuable insight into the rich diversity of the LGBTQ community during this time period.

Resources and References

Much of the material found in this series was deliberately collected and subscribed to by groups in Edmonton acting as community information centres for Edmonton’s queer community. Places like the GATE office, and later the Gay and Lesbian Community Centre and the Edmonton Pride Centre office established library space where reference and resource material was made accessible for their members and interested public. The published items, including books, texts, and periodicals, often bear the stamp of one of the above organizations, and were likely passed on from one location to the next as centres closed and re-opened under new names and structures.

This series, the most extensive of the fonds, consists of the following sub-series: Bibliographies/Directories; Reports and Reference Texts; Articles and Clipping files; Conference information; and Periodicals. The periodicals include both local publications, as well as those published across Canada, in the United States, and elsewhere. For some of the serials, such as The Advocate and Times .10, there are many issues, while others may be represented by just a single issue or volume. The clipping files, likewise, include some topics that are thick with clippings and articles (such as ‘Civil Rights-Equality Rights’, while others may consist of a single item. It is interesting to consider which subjects were deemed important enough or of broader interest to warrant creating a clipping and article file. The Conference files provide information on conferences held locally, nationally and internationally, and often consist of promotional brochures, and related correspondence and printed information.

Michael Phair Records

Michael Albert Phair, born August 1950, served on Edmonton’s City Council representing Ward 4 from 1992 until 2007. He was the first openly gay elected politician in Alberta, and a longtime LGBTQ activist. Phair was a founding member of the Aids Network of Edmonton [now HIV Edmonton], a member of Edmonton’s Pride Festival Society Board of Directors, and a key figure in the work of many of Edmonton’s early and current LGBQT associations. After leaving city council, Phair served on a variety of city organizations, including the Edmonton Social Planning Council, Edmonton Homeward Trust, and the North Saskatchewan River Valley Conservation Society. He is an adjunct professor with the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS) in the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta. The Edmonton Public School Board announced in June 2015 that a west-end school will be named for him (scheduled to open in the fall of 2017), and on February 25, 2016 Michael Phair was named chairman of the University of Alberta Board of Directors.

This series consists of files kept by Michael Phair, including correspondence files; an issue related file on police action in parks, and artifacts including a t-shirt and service award plaque. While this is a very small representation of Michael Phair’s work and impact on the growth of Edmonton’s LBGQT community, it must be stated that in almost every series described in the GALA fonds, researchers will glean the importance of Michael Phair’s contributions. He was instrumental in establishing and helping to maintain many of Edmonton’s LGBQT associations, and was a mover and shaker behind collecting, preserving and eventually donating the Gay and Lesbian Archives to the City of Edmonton Archives. Michael Phair would be the first to recommend that all that he donated be incorporated as part of GALA, and this was achieved with most of what he brought in. The few files listed in this final series are those that could not easily be separated from Phair the individual: correspondence to and from him; his own written notes on specific topics, and his personal artifacts. His donated material included clipping files, subject topic files, and other material, but all was intended as further contributions and accruals for GALA. Needless to say, the researchers studying the history of gay activism in Edmonton will learn about the work and significance of Michael Phair.

Gay and Lesbian Awareness (GALA)

The Gay and Lesbian Awareness (GALA) Society was formed in 1984 as a representative committee struck to petition the city of Edmonton to declare a Gay and Lesbian Awareness Day and Celebration Week for June 1984. GALA incorporated as a non-profit society in May of 1987 and after incorporation, broadened its mandate to include promoting awareness of the gay community and dealing with issues affecting them among Edmonton’s general public. An umbrella group, the GALA Civil Rights Committee, was formed to consider matters of civil rights and the law for Edmonton’s gay community (See Series 9). A second umbrella GALA committee concerned with PRIDE planning and events was also active (See Series 5), and in 1992, a GALA-Police Liaison Committee was established. Both the civil rights work (including the police liaison committee work) and the PRIDE festival planning expanded beyond the confines of GALA, and their work was eventually taken over by other organizing bodies. It appears the final year of GALA’s registration as a Society was in 1994, and post-1994 GALA efforts were largely handled by the Gay and Lesbian Community Centre of Edmonton. The PRIDE Committee work was eventually taken over by the Edmonton Pride Festival Society.

This series consists of GALA’s administrative records including their bylaws and constitution; financial statements; meeting minutes; and correspondence. In addition, there are copies of GALA grant applications, and records related to a GALA sponsored Symposium entitled “Flaunting It!” held in Edmonton in 1990. The meeting minutes and documents of the GALA-Police Liaison Committee are retained in this series, although after 1994, the Committee broadens its title to the LGBTQ Community/Edmonton Police Service Liaison Committee, and committee records continue until 2005.

AIDS Network / HIV Edmonton

The AIDS Network of Edmonton Society, founded by Michael Phair and five others, was incorporated as a non-profit society in 1984. The Society was formed to respond to the growing number of AIDS related diseases being diagnosed amongst the gay community world-wide and the first identified case of AIDS (for a man named Ross Armstrong) in Edmonton. The Society’s mandate was to offer support to individuals with AIDS and ARC (Aids Related Complex), as well as provide education for the general public and high risk groups, and liaise with other agencies and institutions. The Network utilized the services of a large corps of trained volunteers, who were involved with support groups, individual counselling, and a befriending program. A large part of the Society’s efforts, once charitable status was granted, involved fundraising, and numerous benefits and charity events centered on the goal of raising monies for the Society and its work. Money from fundraising went to producing informational pamphlets and overheads for slides, and acquiring office space for the AIDS Network. The AIDS Network established GMOC (Gay Men’s Outreach Committee) ca. 1991 as a peer education project for gay and bisexual men, with the stated goal of being “positive role models for gay or bisexual men and to support them in making healthy lifestyle choices”. (Folder 23). In 1999, the AIDS Network of Edmonton changed its name to HIV Edmonton, and its work is ongoing.

This series consists of the AIDS Network of Edmonton’s administrative files including constitution and certificate of Incorporation; fundraising and educational resources; as well as a sub-series of records related to the Gay Men’s Outreach Committee (GMOC).

Gay and Lesbian Community Centre of Edmonton (GLCCE / Pride Centre of Edmonton

The Gay and Lesbian Community Centre (GLCCE) was incorporated as the new name for the Gay Alliance Toward Equality (GATE) in November 1987 when GATE reapplied for Society status. GLCCE continued in the role of an information/educational centre, complete with a library, telephone information line, drop-in hours, printed information hand-outs, activities bulletin board and peer counselling services provided by GLCCE trained volunteer counselors. Various workshops and support groups for the gay community were administered by and run out of the Centre, and speakers and information provided on request to the Edmonton community and media. Additionally, GLCCE offered social activities including dances, coffee houses and video nights. In 2004, GLCCE was restructured and renamed the Pride Centre of Edmonton, continuing to function as a LGBTQ community resource centre and community gathering space

This series consists of GLCCE records, and one file of Pride Centre records. The files are related to the administration of the Centre, and include correspondence, financial statements, meeting documents, and information resources. A set of five audio cassette tapes are included with the series, involving interviews with individuals significant to the gay movement and history of Edmonton.

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